The Rules

Table Of Content

Welcome to ResLife!

A Living and Learning Environment

Residence Life’s Statement on Multiculturalism

Welcome to Your New Home

Important Dates to Remember

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

What We Are All About…

Center for Academic Excellence

Out-of-Class Experiences

Getting Involved

Hall Senate:

Residence Hall Association:

National Residence Hall Honorary:

Athletics:

Center for Student Involvement (CSI):

Campus Recreation:

Greek Life:

Work Opportunities:

Vaccination and Meningitis Information

Your Truman ID

Meal Plans

Dining Hall Hours

Community Living

Creating Neighbors & Friends

Residence Hall Descriptions

Amenities

Special Accommodations Within the Residence Communities

Where Can I Park?

Hall Services

Barbeque Grills:

Cable Service:

Cleaning Supplies:

Computer Labs:

Duty Staff Members:

Facility Repairs:

Hall Desk:

Hall Offices:

Housekeeping Services:

Insurance:

Keys:

Kitchenettes:

Laundry Facilities:

Mail:

Musical Instruments:

Night Security/Night Monitors:

Picnic Tables:

Posting:

Programming:

Refrigerators/Microfridge Units:

Security:

Storage:

Telephone Services:

My Space/ My Room:

Room Decorating

Temperature Control

Room Sizes

Room Furnishings

What to Bring

Approved Appliances

Approved Electrical Appliances

Not Allowed*

What Not to Bring

Pets

Roommate Relations

What is a Roommate Agreement?

Room Changes

Mediation Process

Consolidation & Room Changes

Housing Renewal/Registration Process

Your Housing Contract

Terms & Conditions – One Year Housing Contract

THE VALUE PLAN

Terms and Conditions – Two Year Housing Contract

Housing Appeals or Grievances

ResLife General Policies

Expected Conduct

Air Conditioners:

Alcohol and Alcohol Paraphernalia:

Appliances or Electronic Devices:

Barbecuing:

Bathrooms:

Bicycles:

Campaigning:

Campus Mail:

Candles/Open Flames/Incense:

Checkout Procedures:

Citizenship:

Combustibles or Dangerous Items:

Damage/Vandalism:

Decorating:

Door Propping:

Drugs & Drug Paraphernalia:

Electrical Systems:

Escort Policy:

Evacuation (Bomb Threats & Fire Alarms):

Eviction or Banning:

Fire or Bomb Threat:

Firearms/Weapons:

Fire Equipment:

Furniture:

Gambling:

Hallway Sports/Behaviors:

Hallway Decorations and Storage:

Holiday Decorations:

Lounge Spaces:

Microwaves:

Noise Policy:

Quiet Hours

Courtesy Hours

Final Exam Quiet Hours

Final Exam Courtesy Hours

More Restrictive Hours

Perimeter of Residence Halls

Musical Instruments

Non-compliance:

Overnight Guests:

Painting Room:

Parking:

Poster/Publicity Display:

Room Doors:

Screen Opening/Removal:

Smoking:

Solicitation:

Tack, Tape, and Adhesives:

Trespassing in Unauthorized Areas:

Unauthorized Moves:

University Identification Card:

Visitation Hours & Escort Policy:

Web Cameras:

Truman’s Alcohol Policy

The Lowdown About Being Dry

University and Residence Life Protocol

University Conduct Process

Citizenship and Community Standards

University Conduct Process

Conduct Information

Safety First

Earthquakes:

Evacuation:

Fire Alarms and Drills:

Medical Emergencies:

Tornados:

A Few Reasons to Live on Campus

Important Numbers

Welcome to ResLife!

The ResLife Staff is committed to making your on-campus living experience memorable and filled with valuable learning opportunities. Please let us know if there is anything we can do to make your on-campus experience better. The Residence Life Handbook outlines the services and building information for all of the residential communities on campus. The Residence Life Handbook has important information for you. Please remember to bring it to campus when you move into your new home. We are so glad to have you as a part of our Truman community of learners and look forward to the next academic year. We hope you are able to make many fond memories, develop new friendships, and find yourself academically and personally successful!

Need to contact Res Life? The Residence Life Office is located in Missouri Hall 1100, 660-785-4227, reslife@truman.edu.

A Living and Learning Environment

Truman State University’s status as a residential institution, where almost half
of all undergraduates live on-campus, opens up unique educational opportunities for you. The University is committed to enriching undergraduate life with experiences that integrate living and learning. As an on-campus resident at Truman, you will be able to participate in the mainstream of the University’s social, recreational, cultural, and educational activities. Ideally, you will find within your residence hall a supportive learning community where you can gain an understanding of yourself and others, explore ideas and values, develop an appreciation for diversity, discover new interests in small group and informal settings, and share some of the fun and satisfaction of life-long learning.

The on-campus living environment for first year students is very important to their adjustment to the first year of college.  Truman also strongly believes that residence halls provide significant opportunities for growth as students learn to relate in positive ways with those who are different from them.  Learning is also enhanced as students consider ideas, experiences and beliefs that are unfamiliar to them.

In assigning students who have not selected a roommate for themselves, we strive to balance the needs for safety and comfort with the opportunity to learn from differences.  If there are certain special circumstances that would require special considerations is assigning you to a roommate due to reasons of physical or psychological safety, please contact the Residence Life Office (Missouri Hall 1100, 660-785-4227) to discuss those needs and to make special requests.

Residence Life’s Statement on Multiculturalism

In the community environment, mutual respect for all residents and staff is essential. Therefore, Residence Life pledges continuing support for the development of a cultural perspective among its staff, residents, and student organizations. Such a perspective encourages an appreciation of the differences among people, promotes harmonious understanding, and provides a culturally enriched environment. Residence Life recognizes individual rights to cultural expression and encourages exploration of other traditions within the parameters of building a positive community environment. Residence Life condemns any conduct that threatens, harasses, or results in abuse of any individual, or particular group, in our community. Incidents of this type should be reported to one or more of the following individuals: your Student Advisor, your Apartment Manager, your Community Coordinator, your Hall Director, an Area Coordinator, the Department of Residence Life, the Multicultural Affairs Center, the Dean of Student Affairs, or the Department of Public Safety. An embracement of multiculturalism recognizes the breadth of experiences represented in the diverse Truman State University community.

Welcome to Your New Home

The living-learning communities that make up our residential areas fit a wide variety of personal needs and preferences. Our residence halls and apartment complexes provide either large communal living environments or more private living spaces. Whatever your choice, we hope to help you find opportunities to meet new people, learn about diverse cultures, be intellectually engaged, and explore new ways to become involved on campus.

You will have both freedom and responsibility here at Truman. Our resources, programs, and policies are designed to create a positive living experience and a stimulating educational environment for our students.


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Important Dates to Remember

The Department of Residence Life uses the University’s master calendar to determine academic break periods. However, due to the nature of living environments, we have specific dates that students need to be aware of for move in and move out, as well as when the residence halls are closed during the academic year. Please refer to the following calendar for these important dates:

Fall 2017

  • Aug. 16: Halls Open for Check In, First-Year & Transfer Students ONLY (8 a.m.-1 p.m.)
  • Aug. 16-20Truman Days
  • Aug. 19: Halls Open for Upper-Division Students Move-In (8 a.m.- 5 p.m.)
  • Aug. 21: Fall Classes Begin; Room Change Waiting List Begins
  • Sept. 4: Pre-Approved Room Changes Permitted (5 p.m.)
  • Sept. 16Family Day
  • Oct. 13-15Homecoming
  • Oct. 19-22: Midterm Break (No Classes)
  • Nov. 17-26: Thanksgiving Break (No Classes) — Halls Closed
  • Nov. 26: Halls Reopen (10 a.m.)
  • Dec. 10: Finals Quiet Hours Begin (12:01 a.m.)
  • Dec. 16: Halls Close for Winter Break (6 p.m.)
  • DecemberHousing Renewal Information Available Online

Spring 2018

  • Jan. 14: Halls Re-open for Spring Semester (10 a.m.)
  • Jan. 16: Spring Classes begin; Deadline for Spring Meal Plan Changes (5 p.m.)
  • February: Housing Registration (Dates to be announced)
  • March 9: Halls Close for Midterm Break (6 p.m.)
  • March 18: Halls Re-open (10 a.m.)
  • April 2: Term Break
  • May 6: Finals Quiet Hours Begin (12:01 a.m.)
  • May 12: Commencement; Halls Close for Summer (6 p.m.)

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What We Are All About…

Residence Life oversees seven residence halls and three apartment complexes, all of which include modern living facilities and are located within easy walking distance of academic buildings. Within these communities are exciting opportunities for personal, social, educational, physical, and emotional growth.

In a college residence hall environment, the impact of where students live has a tremendous effect on their academic, social, and developmental experience in college.

Since Residence Life believes that residence halls are educational environments, a major goal of the staff is to develop and implement programs that meet the social, developmental, and educational needs of students. Thus, the college residence halls become more than a place to eat, sleep, and study.

Residence Life’s staff strongly believes that programming is one avenue by which we can have a strong, positive impact on students outside of the classroom.

Throughout the academic year, programs, events, and activities are planned and provided for students to enrich the living environments and to provide opportunities to learn about new things. The residential communities are designed to bring a rich out-of-classroom experience to students, where they can learn about themselves and others, become involved in leadership positions, or hold discussion groups with other students, faculty, and staff.

Various programs are developed for educational, health and wellness, and social purposes based on observed student needs, or identified through feedback.


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Center for Academic Excellence

Truman’s Center for Academic Excellence contributes to the learning community inside your residence hall. Historically, residential colleges have been places where faculty and students join together as “friends of learning.” At Truman, this liberal arts tradition continues as a natural extension of the University’s focus on your academic success. The Center for Academic Excellence seeks to make the public liberal arts and sciences experience personally vital and meaningful to you. Learn more about the Center for Academic Excellence at excellence.truman.edu.

The Center for Academic Excellence serves as the academic leader for the residence halls, working in cooperation with faculty, residence hall staff, and students to develop programming, including fine arts performances, film series, special topics panels, speakers, quiz bowls, demonstrations, small group discussions, and field trips. The Center promotes meaningful connections between you, as a Truman student, and faculty beyond the traditional classroom setting. In such ways, you join together in a living-learning experience.

The Center for Academic Excellence also provides professional academic advising and support for Truman students in all of our residence halls. A team of professional academic advisors, led by a head academic advisor, offers residential-based academic advising for all first year and undeclared students, plus basic academic planning and support services for all students affiliated with the residence hall. Whatever the needs may be — course registration, general academic planning, tutors, skill or career development workshops, referrals to faculty in academic divisions — all may be brought to the Center for Academic Excellence staff located centrally on campus on the first level of the Kirk Building. The Center for Academic Excellence academic advisors work with faculty from all disciplines in mentoring you. They also work with student advisors to foster relationships and offer resources to keep you learning and developing at the center of residential life.


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Out-of-Class Experiences

As a part of the Student Affairs division, Residence Life is devoted toward optimizing the impact of out-of-class experiences of a student’s college career. We believe that a student’s out-of-class experiences can provide personal and social development of the student, which can enhance the quality of learning and holistic growth of the individual. Truman provides a high quality education with a plethora of ways to get involved and develop leadership skills and problem solving abilities.

These activities include such opportunities as joining a student organization, participating in a theatrical production, holding a student leadership position, attending a cultural event, volunteering in the community, attending an athletic event, meeting diverse people, or simply hanging out with friends. Many of these activities can happen in the living environments or with groups of people who live around you. Numerous educational, social, recreational, or competitive leisure activities and opportunities for peer leadership are available to you within the residence halls and campus wide. Students spend an average of 150 hours per week outside of the classroom, so our role is to work within the University and surrounding community to provide quality options for students to become involved.

An example of how the Student Affairs area has developed ways to enhance the out-of-class experiences of students is through the Cocurricular Planning Map. This tool designed by the Student Affairs helps students make informed and intentional decisions about their out-of-class activities while at Truman State University.

The Planning Map is theoretically based on developmental principles, and consists of four quadrants that represent areas students can use to set goals regarding their out-of-class activities, thereby maximizing the benefits of their Truman educational experience.

The quadrants are based on values and principles espoused in the Truman State University Mission Statement, skills and knowledge of value to future employers and graduate schools, and needs and attributes of college aged students identified by various theories of development.

The Cocurricular Planning Map was developed to achieve a variety of outcomes and purposes including the following:

  • Assist students in making responsible and informed choices about out-of-class experiences.
  • Assist advisors in helping students design their out-of-class experiences
    to meet academic and personal goals.
  • Assist students in setting intentional goals regarding the desired outcomes
    of their out-of-class experiences.
  • Enhance the educational benefit of out-of-class experiences for our students.
  • Facilitate the personal development of Truman students.
  • Encourage offices and persons involved in facilitating out-of-class experiences to maximize the educational benefits of those experiences.
  • Facilitate the integration of out-of-class experiences with the curriculum.
  • To encourage assessment of out-of-class activities.
  • Enhance the liberal arts and sciences culture at Truman State University.

More information visit the Cocurricular Record website.


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Getting Involved

There are several ways to get involved on campus. Below are some general areas that students can become involved as early as the first week on campus.

Hall Senate:

Wondering how to facilitate changes within your living/learning community? Each residence hall houses its own student government, which provides programming and events geared towards residents in that community. Hall Senate meetings are held weekly, where all on-campus residents are welcome to attend and encouraged to voice their feedback regarding decisions made in the halls. Residents can also be involved as representatives of their respective house community, as well as for special event committees that form throughout the year. Elections for Hall Senate Executives vary by hall, some are held in the Spring semester each year and are voted upon by fellow residents, others hold their elections in the Fall semester.  You may check with your specific hall’s Director to find out more about Hall Senate.

Residence Hall Association:

Essentially the parent organization for all of the Hall Senates, RHA serves in a
unique capacity as the central student government for all on-campus residents. RHA is the combination of a programming body and a policy forming body all wrapped into one organization. RHA’s main purpose is to be the voice for on-campus residents, working to provide residents with their perspective on policies and issues that affect the entire residential community. RHA is the driving force of student feedback, which is used within the Residence Life Office to make many administrative decisions. RHA is comprised of students elected by fellow residents, and elections for executive positions take place each spring. Building representatives are elected each Fall semester, giving you the opportunity to help represent your total living environment within the larger campus organization. This organization is a great opportunity to get involved in Residence Life on a larger scale! To learn more about RHA, visit
http://rha.truman.edu.

National Residence Hall Honorary:

NRHH recognizes the accomplishments of individuals who make outstanding contributions to our Residence Life program. The awards program encourages students to nominate their peers, staff, and hall communities for their achievements throughout the year.

Membership in the NRHH organization represents the top 1% of students in the residence halls, and inductees are selected through a nomination process held each semester.

Athletics:

The Department of Athletics is committed to enhancing the University’s commitment to a liberal arts and sciences education by providing a positive experience for over 450 student athletes by  promoting wholesome educational and athletic opportunities. Truman State University is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II and is a charter member of the Great Lakes Valley Conference. Athletics sponsors 21 different sports teams. Men’s sports include football, basketball, swimming, soccer, tennis, baseball, cross-country, indoor/outdoor track,  and wrestling. Women’s sports include volleyball, basketball, swimming, soccer, tennis, golf, softball, and cross-country/indoor/outdoor track.

The Athletic Department is located in Pershing Building with the exception of the Athletics Media Relations, which is located in Kirk Building. Student activities for students who are not a part of the athletic teams include being a part of spirit events, homecoming events, or cheering on your favorite team. For more information, visit  http://www.trumanbulldogs.com/.

Center for Student Involvement (CSI):

Truman has approximately 250 active student organizations which are grouped in the following categories: campus media; cultural; departmental/ professional; Greek governing boards; Greek social fraternities and sororities; honorary; recreational/sports; religious; Residence Life environment; service; special interest; and, student government/political.

At the beginning of each Fall semester, Cardinal Key, the National Honor Society, and the CSI co-sponsor an Activities Fair where students have the opportunity to find out more about Truman’s student organizations. As part of the overall Student Union program, the CSI provides programs and services in the areas of campus programming, student organizations, leadership development, and recognition programs. The CSI is housed in the Student Union, and advises the student activities fee-funded Student Activities Board that provides entertainment for the student body. In addition, the CSI oversees the Take Five Games Room and the Down Under programming facility, and advises the Funds Allotment Council. The Center for Student Involvement also coordinates volunteer opportunities through the SERVE Center, located in the Student Union next to Sodexo’s Mainstreet. More information about the CSI can be found at http://studentinvolvement.truman.edu.

Campus Recreation:

The Student Recreation Center provides programs and services for enhancing the health and well-being of students, faculty, and staff. The Fitness Wellness Program offers wellness workshops, personal training, and a myriad of non-credit classes from step aerobics to martial arts. Intramural Recreational Sports sponsors healthy competition in individual and team sport activities. The Student Recreation Center contains many areas for self-directed activity: a three-court hardwood floor gym, jogging track, aerobics/dance studio, auxiliary court gym with multipurpose floor, and a weight room and fitness area filled with state-of-the-art exercise equipment.

The Student Recreation Center is located on Franklin Street next to Centennial Hall.

For additional information, visit http://recreation.truman.edu.

Greek Life:

Greek letter societies were founded on the ideals of leadership, scholarship, community service, and friendship. Truman’s organizations continue to uphold these ideals.

Greek Life strives to provide guidance and support for students’ out- of classroom involvement. This staff works in partnership with 30 Greek organizations to develop programs and policies that encourage a sense of belonging, promote self-governance, challenge students to gain new skills and knowledge, and enable students to participate in positive individual and societal change. The Office of Greek Life is located in the Brewer Annex, and additional information can be found at http://greeklife.truman.edu/.

Work Opportunities:

There are various opportunities available for you to work not only on-campus, but specifically in the residence halls or campus apartments. Each hall has scholarship, work-study, and institutional paid employment opportunities available. Possible options for work include, but are not limited to: Residence Hall Desk Attendant; Night Monitor; Hall Staff Assistant; or apartments; and Receptionist/Clerical work or special projects in the Residence Life Office or New Student Programs offices.

Working for Residence Life or Residential Colleges provides the convenience of living close to where you work, as well as providing a flexible schedule that allows you to work around your classes and out-of-class activities. For more information regarding other on-campus employment opportunities, contact the University Career Center at x4353, or stop by their office in the McKinney Center to check out the services offered. For more information, visit http://career.truman.edu.


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Vaccination and Meningitis Information

New Immunization Requirement

In 2004, the State of Missouri passed a new state law which requires all students living in university housing to receive education about the meningococcal vaccine and its role in preventing the deadly disease, meningitis. As required by the law, all students living in residence halls will be required to either: 1) show proof of immunization against meningitis within the past three years; or 2) sign a waiver stating they understand and fully accept the potential consequences and liability associated with refusing the vaccine. Students WILL NOT be allowed to move into the residence halls without first meeting the above requirements. The Menomune vaccine will be available at cost through the Student Health Center on an appointment basis.

Please arrange to get the vaccination before next year, and avoid the hassles of standing in line for a vaccination on move in day, or not being able to move into your room at all!

In order to more fully protect the health and well-being of its students, Truman State University requires the following:

All students born on or after January 1, 1957, must have two doses of measles vaccine in order to demonstrate adequate immunity. Students must provide the Student Health Center with official verification of immunization. The following forms of documentation of immunization are acceptable forms of verification:
1) A copy of immunization records from a physician, health department, military record, high school record, or
2) Verification of immunity by serological titer.

Students requesting medical or religious waivers should contact the Student Health Center. Serological titers will be required for students requesting permanent medical or religious waivers of the immunization requirements.

  • Failure to provide verification of the required immunizations will result in a block on the next semesters’ registration.
  • Any student in on-campus housing must have received a meningococcal vaccine or signed a waiver refusing the vaccine. This requirement must be fulfilled before the student will receive a key to their room.
  • You will need to complete a Health History form. A copy of this will be mailed to new students or you may also download the form at http://studenthealth.truman.edu.

Please refer any questions you may have about this vaccine to the Student Health Center at (660) 785-4182. Thank you for complying with this policy in advance by submitting the required documents to Student Health! You will help prevent long lines and frustrating waits on move in day for everybody.


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Your Truman ID

As a Truman resident, you will be issued a student ID, a computer coded card with your photograph on it. Since you will use your student ID for the library, student recreation center, and other areas on campus, you should carry it with you at all times. Campbell and Randolph Apartment residents can purchase meal\ plans or Bonus Bucks, and the credits for the purchased plan is put on their student IDs. You cannot eat without it, and if you lose or damage it, you must report it immediately to the Food Service Office in the Student Union. If you live in the residence halls, your ID also grants you access to the halls.

Lost or stolen cards may be replaced for a $25 fee at the University ID Office, located in the Residence Life Central Office, Missouri Hall 1100. Your student ID is yours and yours alone. No one else may use it under any circumstances, even if you do not use it for a particular meal. If someone other than you uses your ID, it will be confiscated and you will be required to pay a $25 reprogramming fee.


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Meal Plans

As a student living within the residence halls you will select a meal plan with your housing contract. You will have a varied and balanced menu to choose from, including entrees, side dishes, soups, salad and deli bar, desserts, ice cream, and beverages. The cafeterias also feature specialty nights when they serve entrees such as steak and shrimp, or set up buffets where you can make your own specialties.

Campbell and Randolph Apartments have kitchens, so a meal plan is not required with the housing contract. Students living in these apartment complexes who wish to purchase a meal plan may do so during housing renewal or through TruView under the Housing tab via the Deposit and Room Status Inquiry link.

Sodexo Food Service also provides meal transfers or sack lunch arrangements. If you have a class conflict, see the Food Service Manager in the dining facility closest to your hall. Sick trays are available if you are ill or injured and cannot go to the dining service. Students must obtain a permit from their Hall Staff by presenting a student ID. You may arrange to have a friend pick up your meal once this permit is submitted to Sodexo.

Your Meal Plan Options If you live in a residence hall you must select one of the meal plan options for each semester are available to you. These options include:

  • All Access Plan / semester + $75 Dining Dollars -Non-Transferable
  • 20 Meals/week + $100 Dining Dollars
  • 14 Meals / week + $125 Dining Dollars
  • 10 Meals / week + $100 Dining Dollars
  • 150 Meals / semester + $200 Dining Dollars

Bonus Bucks: A declining balance program for students, faculty, or staff, purchased in $25 increments. Bonus Bucks may be purchased at any time during the semester, and carry forward from one semester to the next are a set number of meals that students have available to them to use throughout any given semester.

Students who live in the residence halls must select one of the meal plan options. However, students who want additional meals for dining purposes may purchase a block of 25 block meals, or they can purchase Bonus Bucks in $25 increments through the Sodexo office. If meals or their associated Dining Dollars are not used by the end of the semester, they are not carried forward to the next semester. Students may use their block meals to provide dining privileges for another person. The meals are equivalent to a pre-determined flat transfer amount at Mainstreet Food Court, or other Sodexo dining areas on campus, to purchase food items.

Meal plan options include a designated amount of additional funds (in Dining Dollars) that can be used to purchase food or meals outside of one’s meal plan during transfer hours at Mainstreet. You will select your meal plan when you sign your housing contract. Once you choose your meal plan option, you cannot change your plan option until the next semester.

Meal Flexibility

Transferability is available during the school year. A transfer option allows meal privileges in the Student Union’s Main Street Market, Jazzman’s, Zime, or the Sodexo C-Store to purchase food-related items. Present your student ID and you may select from the menu and receive a designated credit for breakfast, lunch, and dinner (during limited hours Monday- Friday). Any amount over this designated credit must be paid by the student with Dining Dollars, Bonus Bucks, or with cash.

Mainstreet Food Court, located on the main floor of the Student Union, is the central restaurant and gathering place on the main concourse. Every student with a meal plan has transferability privileges and may use their meal cards at this facility. Mainstreet’s hours are from 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday; and 3-10 p.m. on Sunday. (It is closed Saturday.) Specific times for transferability are available from the Food Services Office at (660) 785- 4197.

Jazzman’s, a coffee house features Seattle’s Best coffee, espressos, iced coffee drinks, and cool jazz blasts, or fresh-baked scones, muffins, or turnovers. This relaxing atmosphere is a great place to drink a great cup of coffee, eat a fresh treat, and read a book a magazine for an hour of rest and rejuvenation. Zime, located next to the Jazzman’s Café, offers bistro-style salads, soups, sandwiches, and desserts.

These dining options are located on the main floor of the Student Union Building across from the Hub. Their hours are 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 8  a.m.-8 p.m. Friday; and 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday. They are closed on Sunday.

Sodexo also has several campus convenience stores, or “C-Stores,” within West Campus Suites and Dobson Hall. They will provide “grab & go” convenience options, including food and drinks, as well as some convenience store items. Their hours of operation during the school year are 8 a.m.- midnight, Monday through Thursday;  8 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday; and 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturday and Sunday.

All hours vary during holidays and are subject to change throughout the year. For questions about food service options or special dietary needs, students may call the Sodexo Food Service Office. It is located in the Student Union’s main floor and is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. To learn more about food service options, please check out their website at http://foodservice.truman.edu.

Centennial, Ryle, and Missouri Halls serve three meals a day, six days a week in their dining rooms. There is no evening meal on Sundays, but breakfast (Ryle Hall only) and lunch (all residential dining facilities) are served.

Dining Hall Hours

Dining Hall Hours by Hall/Meal/Day of Week
Centennial HallMissouri HallRyle Hall
Hot Breakfast6:45 – 9:30 am6:45 – 9:30 am6:45 – 9:30 am
Full Lunch10:30 am – 2 pm10:30 am – 2 pm10:30 am – 2 pm
Soup, Salad, Deli2 – 4 pm2 – 4 pm2 – 4 pm
Dinner4:30 – 7 pm4:30 – 7 pm4:30 pm – 7 pm
Friday Dinner4:30 – 6:30 pm4:30 – 6:30 pm4:30 – 6:30 pm
Saturday Breakfast9:00 – 10 am8:30 – 9:30 am8 – 9:15 am
Saturday Lunch11 am – 1:30 pm11 am – 1:15 pm11 am – 1:15 pm
Saturday Dinner4:30 – 6:30 pm4:30 – 6:30 pm4:30 – 6:30 pm
Sunday BreakfastClosedClosed8 – 9:15 am
Sunday Brunch11 am – 1:30 pm11 am – 1:15 pm11 am – 1:15 pm
Sunday DinnerClosedClosedClosed

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Community Living

It may be a new experience for you to become accustomed to living in a new community of people. Many students are away from home for the first time, and find the transition to the college campus to be challenging. Within the University, we are prepared to help you through being trained in areas of student transition and the developmental process that occurs in a college environment. In order to help yourself and others create the smoothest transition possible, there is an expectation that as adults within the community, you will respect yourself, others, and your environment.

As a resident, you have a right to:

  • Read, study, and sleep without interference, unreasonable
    noise, or other distractions
  • Have personal privacy within your hall room or apartment
  • Live in a clean environment
  • Be free from intimidation, physical, and emotional harm
  • Expect that your personal belongings and property will be respected.

As a resident, you have the responsibility to:

  • Respect other residents’ and staff members’ rights
  • Read and adhere to all University and Residence Life rules, regulations, and policies (including the Student Conduct Code)
  • Abide by all federal, state, and local laws
  • Assume the responsibility for the actions of your guests
  • Address situations and communicating concerns about issues that undermine community or individual rights, whether they be your own or others
  • Speaking and listening to others to reach shared understandings
  • Preventing your actions from infringing or violating others’ rights
  • Be accountable for your choices—taking ownership for your actions, opinions, and beliefs, and how that may affect others within the community
  • Comply with the reasonable requests of Residence Life and University staff members
  • Report policy violations to your Residence Life staff or the Department
    of Public Safety

Creating Neighbors & Friends

Your house community will become an important part of your on campus living experience. “Houses” range from 20 to 60  residents, and are used to divide up the residence halls. Each house has a name with some historical reference, and generally refers to a famous resident from the state of Missouri. Your house community will become the place that you call home. You will have the opportunity to meet other individuals, participate in community events and programs, and just have fun!

Using a “house” concept instead of a “floor” concept, we hope to create an environment that is homey, safe, comfortable, and a great place to learn.

Members of each residence hall’s student government (Hall Senates) work together to provide programming and events geared towards residents in that community, and encourage students to voice their feedback regarding decisions made in the halls.

Members of the Residence Hall Association (RHA) are also nominated and selected from every hall. RHA serves in a unique capacity as the central student government, the collective voice, for all on-campus residents. They work   hard to provide residents a way to express their perspectives on policies and issues that affect the entire residential community. RHA combines programming and policy review/proposals for Residence Life. (See the Get Involved section for more information on Hall Senates and RHA.)

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Residence Hall Descriptions

Truman State University has several options for students who will be living on campus, including residence halls and campus apartments. Based on your preferences, you may have such options as quiet floors, community or suite-style bathrooms, single-gender wings or co-ed living arrangements, and large or small buildings. Each of our residence halls, or apartment complexes, houses between 58 and 689 residents.

Approximately 70 percent of the residence hall rooms, or apartments, are designed for two students, with the remaining rooms housing three to four students. If you are an upperclassman or a married student, you may choose to live in the University apartments. Most of these apartments are partially furnished and offer an optional meal plan through Sodexo Food Service.

Where Will I Live?

Truman State University has several options for students who will be living on campus, including residence halls and campus apartments. Residence halls range in size from 68 to almost 700 residents. Within that range are exciting opportunities for personal, social, educational, physical, and emotional growth.

BNB Hall: Renovated in 2007-08, this co-educational complex houses 330 residents on three floors in a suite style room configuration. Each rooms contain two bunkable beds,  two desks, one chests, carpet, one wardrobe, one closet, and suite-style bathrooms. The North wing of the building is home to Truman’s social sororities.

Centennial Hall: The largest residence hall on campus, Centennial Hall houses about 500 men and women on its four floors, and is located directly across from the Student Union and next door to the Student Recreation Center. Each room contains one bed per person that is bunkable and loftable, one closet per room (two in multiple rooms), one desk per person with shelves and drawers, and one dresser per room. There is no carpeting in Centennial Hall rooms.

Dobson Hall: Renovated in 2008-09, this co-educational community hall houses 400 men and women on its four floors. Dobson Hall is located directly east of Violette Hall. Each room is carpeted, contains one desk with shelves and drawers per person, bunkable and loftable beds, one wardrobe with shelves per person, and one chest of drawers per room.

Missouri Hall: Renovated in 2006-07 and located just off the main quadrangle, Missouri Hall houses 522 men and women in a co-ed environment by wing (20 students per wing). Each room is carpeted, air-conditioned, contains one desk with shelves and drawers per person, bunkable and loftable beds, one wardrobe with shelves per person, and one chest of drawers per room.

Ryle Hall: With the north and central portions of Ryle Hall renovated in 2009-10 and the south portion  renovated in 2010-11, Ryle, when at full capacity, can house nearly 530 men and women with living arrangements located near Stokes Stadium and Violette Hall. Each room contains bunkable and loftable beds, one built-in wardrobe closet per room (two in multiple rooms), one desk per person with shelves and drawers, carpeted rooms, and one dresser per room.

West Campus Suites: West Campus suites is a unique building in that it offers two double bedrooms off of a central living room and bathroom. The building was constructed and opened in the Fall of 2006, houses 416 students, and boasts two times the square footage as our standard doubles.  It contains amenities such as air conditioning and laundry, kitchens and computer workstations on every floor.

Apartments: In addition, the University has three furnished campus apartment complexes for upperclassmen. First-year students may not live in these apartments during their first semester on campus unless there is a medical necessity to do so, but may arrange to move to the apartments during their second semester if space is available. More information on University apartments is available online at http://www.truman.edu/student-life/housing/.

Amenities

AmenitiesHousing CapacityGender of ResidentsS = Suite Style, C = Communal, P = PrivateDining FacilityComputer WorkstationsATMGame AreasPing-Pong TableAir ConditioningM
BNB Hall333M/FSNYNNNYN
Campbell Apartments130M/FPNYNNNYN
Centennial Hall515M/FSCafeteriaYNYYNY
Dobson Hall388M/FCC-StoreYNNNYY
Missouri Hall510M/FCCafeteriaYYYYYY
Randolph Apartments^32M/FPNNNNNYN
Ryle Hall533M/FS/CCafeteriaYYYYYY
West Campus Suites416M/FSC-StoreYNYYYY

Special Accommodations Within the Residence Communities

A limited number of rooms and apartments on campus are equipped for persons with disabilities. Those students requiring special accommodations or service animals should register with the Coordinator for Disability Services, located in the Student Health Center, (660) 785-4478. If a service animal is needed, the student may be placed in a room with limited risk of exposing service animals to other residents. For more information, visit  http://disabilityservices.truman.edu.

Where Can I Park?

Students who wish to bring a vehicle to campus must register it with the Department of Public Safety (DPS). You will get an application with your housing information if you are a first-time student. If you are returning, you must contact DPS directly for your application, or use their on-line registration form, located on their website. For more information about parking or campus police services, visit http://police.truman.edu.

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Hall Services

Within the University, or Residence Life, there are a variety of services available to you to help make your living experience enjoyable. Some of the services most applicable for students living in University housing are listed below.

Barbeque Grills:

Students are not allowed to bring their own grills, except for in the apartment complexes. Students may not possess grills in the residence halls. Community grills are available for general student use in designated areas around campus near the residential facilities.

Cable Service:

Each residence hall room and apartment will be provided with basic television cable service through Truman State University as part of the room and board rate. At this time, there are no premium upgrades available to students (including DVR service or additional channels).

Cleaning Supplies:

Brooms, vacuum cleaners, mops, and buckets, as well as various cleaning supplies (e.g. glass cleaner, furniture polish, etc.) are available for checkout at the hall desk with your student ID. Cleaning supplies available at the hall desk vary per hall.

Computer Labs:

Computers and printers are available for your use within designated areas in each of the halls. You must use your own computer disks. Laser printing is also available within the computer labs and at the hall desk, which are open 24 hours per day. Students can map their own personal computers to the lab printers through the University network. Instructions are available through http://its.truman.edu.

Duty Staff Members:

Professional staff and Student Advisors work rotating duty schedules to be on call for emergencies and to conduct rounds within the residence halls and apartments on a daily basis. They are available to respond to your requests 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. These staff members are trained in crisis management, facilities operations, suicide response, alcohol and drug emergencies, and many other areas.

There are also professional counselors from the University Counseling Services on call for emergencies. Because these staff members are either full-time professionals or students, we ask that during the late nighttime hours, you differentiate between an emergency and something that can wait until the morning.

Facility Repairs:

The University Facilities Department will make every attempt to make the necessary repairs to maintain the residence halls or apartment fixtures. If something in your room or bathroom needs repair, or if your window or door screen has become torn or damaged, please call the Fix-It-Line. The Fix-It-Line operates from 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday during University business days. The phone number is x4687, or xINTR (I Need This Repaired). Requests can also be made via an Online Work Request. Emergency repairs occurring outside these hours should be reported to a hall staff member. Repairs will be completed based on a campus-wide priority system including urgency, type of repair, and date received. Student telephone line repairs should be reported to Telephone Services by dialing 0. University personnel are allowed to enter individual apartment or residence hall rooms starting at 8:00 a.m. to perform maintenance functions.

Hall Desk:

The residence halls and the Campbell Apartment complex have their own Hall Desks. Hall Desks are open Monday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m.-12:00 a.m., and on Sunday from 11:30 a.m.-12:00 a.m. The Hall Desk serves as an information resource and provides an assortment of supplies for residents within the building. Students may receive small amounts of change, purchase stamps, or have questions answered by desk staff.

In addition, most halls have sports equipment, games, cleaning supplies, vacuum cleaners, and cooking equipment that can be checked out with your student ID. For Campbell Apartments, vacuum cleaners are available through the Hall Desk. For Randolph Apartments, vacuum cleaners may be checked out through the Dobson or Ryle Hall Desks with your student ID.

Hall Offices:

Each residence hall has its own office to assist students with questions regarding their room, processes or procedures, or problems they may have. There is a professional Residence Hall Director and a Community Coordinator, in addition to Student Advisors and Apartment Managers, available within the building to assist you.

Housekeeping Services:

Housekeepers in your living environment work hard to make your building a comfortable and pleasant place to live. The neat and clean appearance of the halls, lounges, and restrooms is due in large part to their efforts. Housekeepers are not expected to clean unnecessary messes made by residents. Your cooperation in caring for the facilities makes their job easier, creates a pleasant atmosphere, and helps keep room and board costs low. Trash containers are located on each floor for you to empty your personal wastebaskets during the week; on the weekends, trash must be taken to an exterior dumpster. Unwanted large items, such as boxes and carpeting, should be taken directly to the dumpster located outside your residence hall. Do not sweep dirt into the hallways or stairwells. Students who have vandalized property, or caused unnecessary messes, may be subject to disciplinary action and damage expenses equivalent to the full replacement value of the item(s).

Insurance:

The University is not responsible for losses caused by theft, vandalism, resident negligence, or natural disaster. To provide protection against lost, stolen, or damaged items, students are strongly encouraged to take out personal property insurance or be sure that your belongings are covered by your parents’ homeowners’ policy.

Insurance policies through insurance companies may also be taken out as a source of protection. If losses or damages occur as a result of a University facilities malfunction or staff negligence, students are encouraged to forward their concerns to the Physical Plant office within 30 days of the event.

Keys:

A lost key can result in a serious security problem for the residents of a room/suite. For this reason, each time a student reports a lost key, the University re-cores the lock and makes new keys for the residents of the room. The student’s account is charged $30.00 to cover the cost of the core, labor, and new key(s). This fee is non- refundable. For halls that issue mailbox keys or bathroom keys, loss of these keys also will result in a charge of $30.00. Loss of Perimeter Access cards, which provide exterior door access to a building will result in a charge of $25.00 (the cost of a lost ID). University keys may not be duplicated commercially.

Students who lock themselves out of their rooms are able to check out a temporary key at the hall desk. Following the first week of the academic year, a charge will be assessed to the student’s account for use of the lock out service. Charges for the lockout service are as follows:

  • First and second use of temporary key are free
  • Third use of temporary key is $5.00
  • Fourth and each subsequent use of temporary key is $10.00 for each
    occurrence

Students who lock themselves out of a building by not having their student ID card will be charged a building access fee when let into the building by hall staff.

Kitchenettes:

All living environments have kitchenettes available for your use.  A limited amount of cooking equipment is available to students to check out with their student ID at the Hall Desk. Students using community kitchens must clean the area after their use, and not leave food or cooking supplies (including cooking equipment or utensils) in the kitchen. The Housekeeping staff is not responsible for cleaning up unnecessary messes within the residence halls or kitchens. Please refer to the chart in this handbook that lists all approved appliances that students may use within their rooms. Campbell and Randolph apartment residents have their own kitchens, and are expected to keep their kitchen properly cleaned. Students leaving the kitchen unclean may be charged a fee equivalent to an hourly rate and cleaning supplies estimated necessary for cleaning the kitchen.

Laundry Facilities:

All residence halls, and the Campbell Apartments, have laundry facilities. Laundry is included in the room and board rates. All residents will have access to laundry through a code distributed by hall staff. Residents of Randolph Apartments generally use the laundry facility in Dobson Hall, a short distance away.

Clothing items that are left unclaimed in the laundry facility will be donated to a local shelter. It is the community’s responsibility to ensure that laundry access codes are not shared with non-residents.

Mail:

Mail to all Residence Life areas is received and distributed to the campus living environments Monday through Saturday, except on national and University holidays or breaks. Outgoing mail is picked up once a day from the hall desk or other designated mail drop slots when mail is delivered. The following information should appear on mail sent to students:

“Student Name”
Residence Hall or Apartment Name and Room Number
Street Address
Kirksville, MO 63501

An example would be:
Harry Truman
1407 Dobson Hall
1111 South Mulanix Street
Kirksville, Missouri 63501

Street addresses for each area can be found here.

Packages are logged electronically by name at the hall desk and must match with a student name in the roster.  Students must ensure their name appears on the package, properly spelled, and is not that of a parent or someone else. Students receive an email from Residence Life notifying them that a package has been logged at the hall desk. A student must bring their Truman ID card to the desk to pick up and sign for their package. Packages that cannot be logged will be returned to sender.

Letters and other small mail items are placed directly in the student’s provided mailbox. Mail is sorted and distributed by room number. Students must ensure that their address on all mail contains their name, hall name, and room number. Students likely will share a mailbox with their roommate. Students should check their mail every day. Unlike packages, students are not notified when mail is placed in their mailbox. Because mail is sorted by room number, it is likely students will receive mail for past occupants. This mail should be returned to the hall desk for forwarding. Mail that cannot be sorted and distributed will be returned to sender if the postage permits.

Residence Life will make an effort to forward mail and packages for former residents for up to one year after checkout. It is best, however, for students to update their mailing address immediately with vendors and other senders as forwarding increases the chance for loss. Mail and packages will be forwarded to the forwarding address given to Residence Life at the time of checkout. If a resident needs to update their forwarding address, they should contact Residence Life (reslife@truman.edu). Packages can only be forwarded if they were shipped through the United States Postal Service. Packages shipped via carriers (UPS, FedEx, DHL, etc) cannot be forwarded and will be returned to sender. Only letters with first-class postage can be forwarded. Postal regulations do not allow mail with presorted standard, non-profit, or other discount postage types to be forwarded or returned to sender.

All mail delivered in mailboxes must include the name and address of the resident and a return address. A campus mail system operates for all academic and residential buildings, including the campus apartments. According to U.S. Postal regulations, only University business mail may be sent through the campus mail system. (Holiday/Birthday cards or personal mail sent among residents is not considered University business mail.) Personal mail sent through the campus mail system will be returned to the sender, or declared not deliverable if no return address exists.

United States Postal Service mail is delivered first to Campus Mail Services and then to the residence halls. Packages from the carriers are delivered directly to the residence hall desks unless the desks are closed for holidays and breaks, in which case it will be left with Campus Mail Services until the hall desks reopen. It is highly recommended that students who will be receiving packages or mail that hold monetary value have these packages insured. Mail shipped with “Delivery Confirmation” from the Post Office only shows that the mail was marked for delivery at the Post Office. It does not show that the mail was ever delivered to campus. Mail shipped with “Signature Confirmation” is signed for by Campus Mail Services staff when it arrives and is then taken to the residence halls. The University is not responsible for lost, stolen, or damaged mail, or mail that is not picked up by the owner. Students are only allowed to pick up their own mail. For your own security, always lock your mailbox, and do not disclose your mailbox combination to any other person.

Musical Instruments:

Some residence halls have pianos available for your use. You are requested to respect the rights of others when using any musical instrument. You are allowed to play handheld instruments at a reasonable level during non-quiet hours, but are not allowed to play scales at any time. Space is available, through the Fine Arts Department, in academic buildings for practicing instruments. Residents must comply with any request, made by other community members or hall staff, to stop playing.

Night Security/Night Monitors:

All residence halls have night monitors to admit residents and escorted guests into the building after it has been secured for the evening at 12:00 a.m. From 10:30 midnight, students who live on campus may use their student ID to gain access to any residential facility using yellow and green door perimeter access boxes. After midnight, you must present your student ID card or official ID (if not a Truman student) to be admitted into the building in which you live, after using your student ID to enter the green entrance to the building in which you reside. If you have guests, you must sign those guests into the logbook. Identification of your guest will be required.

Non-compliance with this process, including falsification of names in the registration log, poses a security risk to the building resulting in a conduct review and denied entrance. In extreme circumstances of security risk, Residence Life reserves the right to lock down the residential facilities.

Picnic Tables:

Residence Life provides numerous picnic area around campus that students can use when studying outdoors, eating meals, or hanging out. Several areas also have barbecue grills.

Posting:

Campus business mail must be properly addressed to the student (name, residence all or apartment, room number), faculty, staff, or campus office, and must have a return address listed on it. Campus organizations who wish to post posters in the residence halls advertising University related events must bring their posters to Residence Life.  Please refer to the University posting policy, found on the Center for Student Involvement website at csi.truman.edu/files/2014/08/Truman_Posting_Policies_2013_for_web.pdf.

Programming:

Staff members from Residence Life or the New Student Programs plan opportunities to expose you to knowledge, new ideas, different philosophies, and thought provoking stimuli. Much of a student’s college experience is to learn outside of the classroom setting, so programs, activities, and events are designed to help students experience new things through social and educational interactions. Programming is done in a variety of areas that align with our departmental core values, and are designed to develop the whole person. These areas include: Diversity; Scholarship; Service; Wellness; Life Skills; and Community. Programming areas may include: lip syncs, special interest panels, movie nights, literature discussions, and the like. From learning more about your roommate, to discussing the different types of religions represented on campus, there is something for everyone throughout the year. If you have a topic you would like to see, let your Student Advisor, Hall Director, or Academic Advisor know about it! All efforts for programming and the creation of a quality living-learning community should utilize at least one of the six core values, and the needs assessment or student interest surveys. The core value areas that are defined for our department are listed within our Residence Life mission statement and can be accessed here.

Refrigerators/Microfridge Units:

Microfridges contain a large refrigerator, freezer, and microwave, and can be rented for $150.00 per academic year. This fee will be charged to the student’s account who holds the contract for the unit. It is a good idea to submit your request early, because these are offered on a first-come, first-serve basis. Often times roommates choose to split the rental costs for a microfridge, however this must be handled between roommates.  Charges will ONLY be applied to the account of the resident contracted.

Residents of BNB Hall, Centennial Hall, Dobson Hall, Missouri Hall, Ryle Hall, West Campus Suites, Randolph & Campbell Apartments may bring their own microwave (1000 watts or smaller). In the event that you wish to bring your own refrigerator, it must be less than 2’w x 3’h x2’d. Refunds for microfridge units are not given once the academic year begins if the student has already been issued the unit.

Security:

Part of the obligation of community living is to help safeguard the living environment. Thousands of people, both residents and non-residents, have access to the halls. Because of this, you are encouraged to keep your room locked at all times and also report people who seem to be tampering with locks, damaging facilities, harassing students, or having suspicious behavior to a staff member. Do not prop open community bathroom doors or the building’s exterior doors unless there are designated approved times to do so as directed by hall staff. You are advised to be particularly security-minded at times of check in, vacations, checkout, or when fewer residents are in the halls.

The non-emergency telephone number for Public Safety is (660) 665 – 5621. The emergency number is x911. There are emergency phones mounted on bright blue or red posts located around campus. Public Safety has fully sanctioned police officers and trained security patrol to monitor and secure the outside of buildings, as well as public areas, and to assist with any emergency within the University.

Storage:

Storage of personal belongings during the summer is very limited. If you are a student living more than 300 miles from Truman over the summer months, you may be allowed to store a limited amount of personal belongings during the summer. You can contact your Residence Hall Director for specific summer storage guidelines and information. A storage fee will be assessed for any items that are stored. The University is not responsible for any items stored by a student.

Telephone Services:

Telephone service is available for a $100 annual fee. You are responsible for supplying your own touch tone telephone (please do not bring 2mHz phones as they interfere with the wireless networks). If there is a problem with your phone service, plug in a phone you know is working prior to reporting service line problems to Telephone Services (dial “0”). The University is not responsible for repairing telephone instruments.

Your phone service has the following special features:

    • On-campus Calls: When using a campus phone to call another campus phone number, only dial the last four digits.
    • Local Calls: You can access an outside (Kirksville) phone line by dialing “9.”Wait for the dial tone, then dial the local number.
    • Long Distance Calling: Students are highly encouraged to bring calling cards or cellular phones to make long distance phone calls, since this service is no longer provided through the University Telephone Services.
    • Credit Card Calling: You may arrange for a telephone credit card with long distance service if you wish to be billed for long distance calls, but you may not charge these calls to your room telephone.
    • Debit Card or Toll-Free Calling: If you need to use your phone debit card or wish to call a toll-free number, just dial “9”, wait for a dial tone, then dial the phone number.
    • Collect Calls: Do not accept any collect calls. If you do, you will be responsible for all related charges.
    • Voice Mail: The University has a voice mail system for all faculty, staff, and students living on campus. This system serves as an answering machine for each resident. You will want to set up your voice mail account as soon as you arrive on campus, and check your messages frequently.

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My Space/ My Room:

Room Decorating

Your room gives you the opportunity to create a new living environment. This is your home away from home, so decorating and personalizing your room is strongly encouraged. Because students will receive room assignments and roommate information in the summer, you will be able to talk to, write to, or email your roommate before you move to campus. Space is limited, so we encourage you to communicate with your future roommate about what you would like to share to avoid duplicating non-personal items. Any furniture that is in your room when you arrive must stay in your room.

Storing residence hall furniture outside of its original room is strictly prohibited and may result in fines. Specific information on room decorations is found elsewhere on this page. You may hang posters and pictures from the wall. However, this must be done with non-damaging materials or removable hangers to prevent damages. Special products, such as poster tack or non-damaging hangers, are available, through general retail stores, to hang items on painted walls that do not damage the walls.

Since Truman is a dry campus, we do not allow any alcohol beverage containers (empty or full), boxes, bottles, or cans in the residence hall rooms. Even though an empty champagne bottle may hold sentimental value to you, please leave it at home.

Temperature Control

When decorating your room, please take care to not place any items in ways that they block the ventilation system in your room. If blocked, air cannot circulate through it to heat your room during the cold season. If your room is not heating, check the area around the ventilator first before calling your Student Advisor or the Facilities Fix-It Line. Due to fire safety policies, students are not allowed to have space heaters; however, if the temperature in a student room is less than 65 degrees Fahrenheit as determined by Facilities heat sensor, Facilities may temporarily issue one to that student after the student pays a security deposit.

Room Sizes

Residence Hall NameApproximate MeasurementsWindow Size
Blanton-Nason-Brewer Hall
Double Room11’5″ x 13’4″6’3″W x 4’8″H
Deluxe Double5’10″W x 4’8″H
Multiple Occupancy (triple)17’6″ x 15’9″6’3W x 4’8″H & 3’W x 4’8″H
Centennial Hall
Double Room13’11” x 11’8″6’3″W x 5’H
Multiple Occupancy (triple)19’4″ x 12′6’3″W x 5’H
Multiple Occupancy (four person)4’8″x20’10″x16’x8’6″x25’10”6’3″W x 5’H
Dobson Hall
Double Room14’6″x11’10”6’5″wx5’10″h
Multiple Occupancy (triple)14’6″x23’6″6’5″wx5’10″h & 3’3″wx5′ h
Missouri Hall
Double Room14’6″x11’8″6’3″W x 5’6″H
Deluxe Double14’6″x16’10”6’3″W x 5’6″H
Ryle Hall
Double Room12’4″x14′6’3″wx5’h
Double Room (Community Bath)12’x14′6’3″wx5’h
Single Room25’8″x25’8″x25’8″6’3″wx5’h
West Campus Suites
Shared Living Space13’6″x11’7″
Bedroom15’8″x11’7″4’w

Room sizes and shapes vary between each residence hall because of the building’s unique design and room types. Because so many rooms differ in size, Residence Life does not have exact room, window, or closet measurements for each specific room on campus. However, student/parents are allowed to have a “sneak peek” at sample rooms in the halls/apartments during Orientation sessions in June. Because students’ plans sometimes change, room assignments are not completely final and are still subject to change until the students move to campus.

Therefore, approximate room sizes are listed on the chart and it is highly recommended that you measure your room after you arrive before you purchase items that require specific dimensions (carpet, curtains, etc.).

Room Furnishings

The University furnishes most rooms with bunkable/loftable beds, standard twin sized mattresses (36″ x 76″), a dresser or drawers to share between residents, closets or wardrobes, and window mini-blinds. All residence hall rooms and apartments have a desk with drawer space for each resident. Each room in our residence halls contains one bed per person, which may be bunked or  lofted (extra pieces are included to form a loft, which allows desks and chairs to be placed underneath). The lofts are secure and are provided to each student living in the halls. Homemade lofts are not allowed. Bed rails are also provided.

If you are 6’4″ or taller, you may request an extra-long bed and mattress by calling the Facilities Department at (660) 785-4687. A limited number are available. You will need to provide: your full name, your height, your housing placement (building and room number), and a contact phone number.

Please bring your own wastebaskets, since they are not provided in any individual rooms on campus. Each hall has large waste and recycling receptacles located in common areas. Recycling bins for students may be available, on a limited basis by calling the Recycling Center at x7672 once students are on campus. Also, students will need to provide their own shower curtains, shower curtain hooks, and toilet paper for rooms with suite-style bathrooms. The cleaning of suite-style or private bathrooms is the responsibility of the residents residing in those rooms.


What to Bring

If you do not know your roommate(s) before you move to campus, it is a good idea to contact each other before you arrive. Be sure to share what each other is planning to bring, and what can be shared in your room.

You may want to bring a mattress pad or “eggcrate” foam padding, bed linens (rooms contain standard twin beds that measure 36″x76″), pillow, blanket, bedspread, clothes hangers, wastebasket, desk light, a telephone (touch tone), and shower curtain (Apartments, Blanton-Nason-Brewer, Ryle, Centennial, and West Campus Suites). You are encouraged to bring a fan to help circulate cool air during the early Fall and late Spring. You may also bring any approved electrical appliances that fall into our approved appliance categories as listed in this handbook. Students bringing small refrigerators must limit them to 2’w x 3’h x 2’d in size. Residents using extension cords are strongly encouraged to use grounded 3-prong, 15-amp minimum, extension cords and/or surge protectors. All electronics or appliances must be UL approved and in good, working condition.

You may use approved appliances, stereos, lights, and other electrical devices as listed in this handbook. All two-prong extension cords and halogen lamps are prohibited because of the fire hazard they represent. Residents must report all electrical problems experienced in their rooms (e.g., tripped circuit breakers) to their Student Advisor, the Hall Director, or the Facilities Fix-It Line.

You may set up various systems of antennas inside your room to increase radio reception as long as no damage to your room occurs. Antennas are prohibited outside room windows or in the hallways. Basic cable will be provided to all residence hall rooms, so students only need to bring their televisions and coaxial cables.

Approved Appliances

Approved Electrical Appliances

Allowed only if UL approved & in good condition

  • Alarm Clock/ clock
  • Aquarium with fish (up to 30 gallon maximum)
  • Automatic iced tea maker
  • Blender (allowed in BNB, Dobson, Ryle, Missouri, and West Campus Suites)
  • Bread Machine
  • Can Opener
  • Coffee Maker/ Electric Tea Kettle
  • Computer
  • Crock-pot/ Slow Cooker
  • Curling Iron or Hot Rolling Curlers
  • Electric Blanket
  • Fan
  • Food Dehydrator
  • Gaming Console
  • Hair Dryer
  • Heating Pad
  • Hot Air Popcorn Popper
  • Indoor Holiday Lights
  • Iron with Automatic shut-off
  • Lava lamps
  • Microwave, 1000 watts or smaller
  • Non-halogen Lamps
  • Radio
  • Razor
  • Rice Cooker
  • Small Refrigerator (2′ x 3′ x 2′)
  • Stereo
  • Television
  • VCR/ DVD/ Blue-Ray Player

Not Allowed*

  • Air Conditioner** (See chart below)
  • Cappuccino Maker
  • Convection Oven
  • Deep Fat Fryer
  • Electric Crepe/ Sandwich Maker
  • Electric Fry Pan
  • Electric Grill
  • Electric Hamburger Cooker
  • Electric Mixer
  • Electric Waffle Iron
  • Electric Wok
  • Fondue Pot
  • Food Processor
  • Grill or Grill Convertible
  • Halogen Lamps
  • Holiday Lights (outdoor)
  • Hot Oil Popcorn Popper
  • Hot Pot or Hot Plate
  • Indoor Grill or Broiler
  • Outdoor Grill (charcoal or propane)
  • Space Heater
  • Sun Lamp
  • Toaster/ Toaster Oven
  • Warming Tray

*If your item is not listed, please consult with your Hall Director/Graduate Community Director or the Residence Life Central Office

Allowed Only With Permission from Residence LifeSpecial Circumstances
Needed for Approval
Additional Usage Fee Required
Air Conditioner**
(6,000 BTUs max.)
Physician’s Certification validating the medical necessity.$100 energy use fee due by Aug. 1
($40 late fee will apply after that date.)
Microwave***
(1,000 watts max.)
Only permitted when rented as part of a Microfridge unit$150 rental fee for the Micro-fridge unit for the academic year.

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What Not to Bring

…Please Leave it at home.
To prevent severe electrical overloading of our circuits, general microwaves and air conditioners are restricted from campus, unless a student meets certain requirements.

  • Air Conditioners are also prohibited unless the student presents a new prescriptive letter every academic year from a medical family practice physician or allergist (M.D. or D.O.) certifying the medical necessity of having an air conditioner in his/her residence hall room or apartment. The physician’s certification must be provided to the Disabilities Services Office before August 1. (After that date, a $40 late fee will be assessed.) If approved, a $100 energy use fee will be charged to your student account. Approved air conditioners must be provided and installed by the student, and may not exceed 6,000 BTUs. All physician certifications will be jointly reviewed and approved by the Disability Services medical staff and Residence Life. Students with unapproved air conditioners will be charged the $100 energy use fee, a $40 penalty fee, an unapproved appliance fine (up to $25/day), and asked to remove the air conditioning unit immediately. The student may reinstall the a/c unit once appropriate medical certification is received and approved.

Blanton-Nason-Brewer Hall, Dobson Hall, Missouri Hall, Ryle Hall, West Campus Suites, Randolph Apartments, and Campbell Apartments have air conditioning in the student rooms. Centennial Hall does not have air conditioning in the student rooms.

Community kitchens are available in the residence halls to encourage cooking in common areas rather than in individual student rooms. High heat or open coil appliances are not permitted at any time. Students are required to clean up all cooking areas after use, including community kitchen areas. Students leaving the kitchen unclean may be charged a fee equivalent to an hourly rate and cleaning supplies estimated necessary for cleaning the kitchen.

The possession of prohibited appliances or electronics may result in a daily $25 fine per item and possible residential conduct review. Students will be required to move the prohibited appliances off-campus, or to a designated storage area in the hall until they can be permanently removed from campus. The University reserves the right to enter student room for the purpose of inspection, safety concerns, maintenance, or repair. The University further reserves the right to enter an assigned room and to inspect the possessions of the occupants if reasonable cause exists to believe that the student has violated University rules and regulations (including possessing an item which is not allowed), or is in danger. During inspections, some personal items may be moved by staff to fully inspect, disconnect, or unplug items in your room.

Pets

What About Fido and Fluffy? Unless Fido and Fluffy are fish or small amphibians, please leave them at home. Students are prohibited from having crustaceans, reptiles or mammals including turtles, lizards, snakes, hermit crabs, lobsters, or other animals. Residents may have fish or small amphibians in the residence halls or apartments if they are nonpoisonous and are contained in a tank no larger than 30 gallons. Residents are expected to take proper care of the hygiene of the pet and tank maintenance. If proper hygiene and maintenance is not taken, the student will be required to remove the pet(s) from the residence hall or apartment. Service animals may be permitted with required documentation of need, and only after joint approval has been granted through Disability Services and Residence Life. Since students share a living space with other residents, all approved pets must be accepted by all roommates.


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Roommate Relations

What is a Roommate Agreement?

Living with another student is a rewarding but sometimes challenging experience. Once you arrive on campus (or anytime you have a new roommate), you should sit down with your roommate(s) and talk about some of the challenges that you may face over the next year. The hall staff will provide the residents of each room with a Roommate Agreement that will be due back to the hall office in the first few weeks of school.

If problems arise throughout the year, your Student Advisor will try to work with you and your roommate(s), and use the Roommate Agreement as part of the discussion.

If one person in the room is violating an agreed upon point that is listed in the agreement, the SA will work with the residents to help enforce the items in the Roommate Agreement. If sections of the contract differ according to preferences of each roommate, the SA will go with the most conservative point.

Click here to download and fill out a Roommate Agreement (Adobe
7 Required – Click here to download
)

Room Changes

Room, roommate, or building changes can take place after the second week of regular semester classes during the Fall and Spring semesters. This waiting period is necessary so the University can determine which students have arrived for the semester in order to identify all available spaces. Students can, however, begin signing up on the online room change request form, Roommate Central, which is available on the Residence Life website starting the first day of classes. When a student fills out a room change request in Roommate Central, the Hall Director in the hall they currently live in will be automatically emailed. The Hall Director will then get in contact with the student to discuss a possible move. The Hall Director can assist the student with where possible open rooms are and whether such a move would be sensible decision for the student. The Hall Director will assist students in finding the living situation that works best for each student. The room change form within Roommate Central will be available online for the entire academic year.

Mediation Process

Your Student Advisor will be able to inform you of the mediation services available on campus. Mediation is a process where each person involved in a conflict sits down with a trained mediator to express his or her perspectives. The goal of mediation is for all parties involved to work towards a compromised solution. If you are having roommate issues and would like assistance, please fill out the form requesting assistance at Roommate Central or contact your Student Advisor or Apartment Manager. After mediation, if it is determined by the mediator and your Hall Director that you and your roommate(s) cannot live together, they will then work with you to determine the best solution to the conflict.

This ensures all people involved in the conflict have had a chance to communicate their concerns related to the living situation. Residence Life believes the ability to work with differences to be a valuable growth opportunity for college students, therefore, room changes are the last resort for roommate conflicts.

Consolidation & Room Changes

As vacancies occur in the residence halls throughout the year, students will receive a consolidation letter giving them options for that space. If your room is under capacity (less than maximum capacity in any room), you will have the following options if there is not a housing waiting list or other demand for the space:

  • You may have another student (by mutual agreement) move into your room.
  • You may move into another student’s room.
  • Leave the unoccupied space open which puts that opening on the list of available spaces for any student that needs to change rooms. Residence Life reserves the right to move another student into that space or move you into a different space if necessary. All residents must be welcoming of potential roommates. Students who choose this option will be sent through the Residence Life conduct system if they verbally, in writing, or otherwise turn away potential roommates for non-legitimate reasoning.
  • If occupancy levels permit, you may pay an increased cost and continue in the same room if there are less people living in a room than can be assigned to that space. This is called “buying out” your room to have a Super Single Room.

If you are changing rooms/halls, you must officially check out of your current room/hall and check in to your new room/hall, or face fines for improper checkout. Room moves may only be made with prior approval from your Hall Director. The student is responsible for completing the proper room checkout procedures, and may not move into another room until they are approved. Any questions about the move process should be directed to your Hall Director or the Residence Life Office. Room changes must occur within one week of an option being selected with the Residence Life housing placement staff, or the student may be charged with an improper room change fine. Students moving into a different room type will have their housing charges adjusted to reflect a different room rate (double, multiple, single, super single, apartment, etc.). This new rate is effective on the actual move date, or the approved move date, whichever is earlier.


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Housing Renewal/Registration Process

Housing Renewal/Registration for the Fall Semester takes place during February. During this time you have the option of returning to your current room/suite or choosing to move to a new room in your building or across campus; regardless where you move you will need to find a roommate. Unfortunately, we are unable to allow residents to sign up for rooms without a roommate. In an effort to create the best possible experience for first year students we have a policy that prevents us from placing upper-class and first year students as roommates (unless reciprocal requests have been made). In December, you will be able to find additional housing renewal information on the Residence Life website at /.


Your Housing Contract

Read the fine print
Residents sometimes don’t read their housing contract, or they misunderstand or misinterpret them. This can result in forfeiture of deposit, damage charges, termination fees, or other financial losses. It is very important that you realize you have signed a legal contract to reside in a hall or apartment for an academic year, spring semester, or a complete summer session. The contract is an agreement between you and the University and is designed to protect both parties. Contracts issued in the Fall semester are for the entire academic year. There are significant penalties for those individuals who choose to break their contract for non-academic related purposes.

On the housing contract, you must check the meal plan option that you want to have for the Fall semester. The meal plan option may be changed for the Spring semester, but students are NOT allowed to switch plans mid-semester after they have selected their option. The housing contract also has a space where you can indicate if you wish to request a Microfridge unit. However, this indication is simply for the Residence Life office to estimate numbers and in no way exempts you from further submitting the Microfridge contract. The $150 rental fee will be added to students’ accounts.

Residence Life Contract
This contract is an agreement between Truman State University and the individual student for the period indicated. This agreement entitles the student to the use of the University’s accommodations as long as the student remains in compliance with the Terms and Conditions of Residence specified in the contract and as described in the Residence Life Handbook and the standards of the Truman State University Student Conduct Code, and does not behave in such a way as to jeopardize the maintenance of a safe, collegial living environment conducive to the educational mission of the University. Students and their parents, or guardians, are urged to read this contract carefully. If the student is under the age of 18, a parent or guardian must sign the contract along with the student. The University agrees to provide accommodations under the conditions of this agreement and as described in the Residence Life Handbook. By signing the contract, the student is acknowledging that they are entering into a legally binding contract for the period specified. Breach of the contract will result in the penalties described in the Terms and Conditions of Residence.

The student also agrees to pay all associated charges for the room type that is added to his/her student account. The Housing Contract may not be altered or changed to amend the terms and conditions of the agreement.

First Year Residency Requirement:
Because of the value of the residential experience and its impact on student learning and connections to the University, all first year students are required to live on campus. Students who wish to appeal for an exemption may do so ONLY if they fit the following exemption areas, as listed in the Student On-Campus Residency Requirement of the University Housing Contract. (residence waiver form [pdf])

Minimum Enrollment Requirement:
Undergraduate Students are required to be enrolled and actively participating in a minimum of 12 credit hours (graduate students must be enrolled in at least six credit hours) at the beginning of any given semester in order to live on campus. Students who drop below the minimum credit hour requirements may be required to leave campus if they become disruptive to the community in which they live or if they are not attending classes.

Checkout Requirement:
Students are required to checkout of their on-campus living area within 24 hours of their withdrawal date, or within 24 hours of their last final exam. Students who do not comply with this policy may be charged an improper checkout fee, as well as daily charges for their housing. Students who do not comply may also face a conduct hearing.


Terms & Conditions – One Year Housing Contract

PDF of the 2017-2018 Housing Contract

Contract Period:
A residence hall or apartment contract is binding for the entire academic year, spring semester or summer session designated on the application-contract, which is signed on an individual basis by each student and becomes a contract upon acceptance by the University. Rooms may be occupied and meals will be served during the periods stated in the University Residence Hall calendar for the applicable semester or session. The room and board fees do not cover periods of time when the halls are closed for vacation, and residents may not live in the halls during such times.

Use of Assigned Room.
The room assigned to a student is to be occupied by him or her, and a student may not sublet the assigned room. Rooms are for student residence purposes only, and a student may not use his or her assigned room for any commercial purposes whatsoever. Students may not allow another person to live with them who is not assigned to that room by the University. Students allowing an unassigned person to live with them will result in disciplinary action and possibly additional housing charges.

Student On-Campus Residency Requirement.
All first-time freshmen are required to live in campus housing. Exemptions include students over 21 years of age, married students or students commuting and living with a parent or legal guardian. Any student violating this policy is subject to housing charges applied to their account, and possible suspension from the University. Exemptions forms must be notarized and are legal documents.

Acceptance of Application.
The University reserves the right to reject an application for accommodations in the University residence halls/apartments. If the University accepts an application, the student will pay all charges for the accommodations assigned at the rate and times established by the University.

Assignments.
The University shall have the right and privilege to (a) change a student’s room (or roommate) assignment; (b) require a student to move to a different room; and (c) place additional students in a student’s assigned room. The inability of the University to grant a student’s assignment preference shall not void his or her application/contract. If a student fails to occupy his or her assigned room on or before the second day of classes of the applicable period without notifying the Residence Life Office in writing of a delayed arrival, the tardy student’s room may be assigned to another student.

However, a student’s delayed arrival shall not relieve the student from accepting other available accommodations, which may be assigned to him or her by the University.

Students who sign a housing application/contract and fail to notify Residence Life that they will not be living on campus will subject to all contract breakage penalties, the loss of their housing deposit, and prorated room and board charges. The student may not alter or amend the application-contract.

Application of Deposit.
A student shall pay the housing deposit at the time of his or her application for housing. The University will retain it until the end of the application/contract period. If the student has properly performed his or her duties under the contract, including proper checkout, and if the student does not have any delinquent debts to the University at the end of the contract period, a portion will be refunded to the student shortly thereafter.

The remainder of the deposit will be retained as a processing fee in all cases. If a student is responsible for any unpaid damages or is delinquent on any debts to the University, the appropriate portion of the deposit will be applied toward the payment of such damages or debts, and the balance of the net deposit will be refunded. In the event a student is responsible for damages or delinquent debts in excess of the deposit, the entire amount will be applied toward the payment of such damages or debts, and the student shall be liable for the remaining balance of the damages or debts.

Refund of Deposit.
The refundable portion of the deposit will be returned to a student upon satisfactory completion of his or her contract without any delinquent indebtedness to the University. The refundable portion of the deposit also will be returned to a student upon the following conditions:
(a) If the University does not accept the student’s application for housing or
(b) If the student is denied admission to the University for the applicable period.

The refundable portion of the deposit will be refunded to a student who has not previously attended the University if the student notifies the University in writing prior to May 1 for fall Semester and October 1 for Spring Semester enrollment that he or she will not be attending. In all other cases, the University reserves the right to retain the refundable portion of the deposit as liquidated damages for breach of contract.

Checkout and Vacation of Room.
Upon termination of his or her contract, a student is required to complete a prescribed checkout procedure for his or her room in the presence of a staff member by following the procedures established by the Residence Life Office. Failure to check out properly will result in one or more of the following: retention of the refundable portion of the deposit as liquidated damages, an improper checkout fee, and/or a loss of key fee. In addition, the resident will be responsible for any additional damages. A student is required to vacate his or her assigned room by the times established by the Residence Life Office. Failure to vacate will result in additional charges.

Renewal of Contract.
If a student requests the renewal of his or her contract for a subsequent period, and if the application for renewal is accepted by the University, then the refundable portion of the deposit for the current contract will be transferred to the student’s credit for the renewal contract. If the deposit is reduced to less than the refundable portion of the deposit (due to damages, other debts to the University, etc.) the student shall pay the necessary amount to restore the deposit to the full balance. In addition to the refundable portion of the deposit, the University may require partial prepayment of room and board fees for the new contract. If the student signs a new contract and then decides not to live in the residence halls or apartments for the new contract period, the University shall have the right to retain the refundable portion of the deposit, the required prepayment amount, and impose a penalty as damages for break of contract and possible prorated room and board charges.

Room and Board Fees.
Room and board fees are due on or before the dates stated in the residence hall/apartment payment schedule for the applicable period. If the designated amounts are not paid on or before the due dates, the University may assess an additional fee for each late payment. In addition, the University may 1) suspend board privileges during such periods of delinquency or 2) terminate the contract.

Inspection.
The University reserves the right to enter the assigned room for the purpose of inspection, safety concerns, and maintenance or repair. The University further reserves the right to enter the assigned room and to inspect the possessions of the occupants if reasonable cause exists to believe that the student has violated University rules and regulations. The University reserves the right to remove or move personal belongings as part of this process.

Fire, Theft or Other Damage.
The University shall not be responsible for the loss of, or damage to, any personal property of a student from any cause whatsoever. In the event the room assigned to a student is destroyed or rendered wholly uninhabitable by the University and the University does not elect to furnish other accommodations, the contract shall be terminated as of the date of destruction. In the event of such termination, any prepaid room and board fees shall be reduced proportionately. The University recommends that students take out homeowners or apartment insurance to protect their belongings.

Housekeeping Services.
The University shall provide housekeeping service in the hallways and other common areas of the residence halls. Each student shall provide housekeeping services in his or her assigned room.

Damages.
A student is liable for the cost of any repairs made necessary by the fault or negligence of the student or by his or her invited guests. The responsible resident shall pay the amount of damages to University property.

Rules and Regulations.
A student shall comply with all rules and regulations for University residence halls and apartments, including but not limited to the rules and regulations contained in the University Residence Life Handbook. Violators of such rules and regulations are subject to disciplinary action and/or termination of contract by the University. Reasons for disciplinary action or termination include, but are not limited to: failure of the student to comply with the terms of this contract or be formally enrolled at the university; involvement of the student in actions or activities detrimental to the health, safety, welfare, or security of self or other residents, or disruptive of the residence hall community. A housing contract may be immediately suspended and the resident
required to vacate the premises when circumstances indicate that the resident’s continued presence in the living unit may constitute danger, or threat of danger, to property, the resident, or others in the housing system.

Other Debts to the University.
If a student permits any debts to the University to become delinquent, the delinquency may result in the placement of a “hold order” on the student’s records. In addition, the University also may suspend the student’s board privileges or terminate the student’s housing contract.

Imposition of Fines and Charges.
Fines may be assessed to a student(s) for violation of University or Residence Life Policies and/or the Student Conduct Code. Charges for damage to residence halls, rooms, and any other university property will be assessed to the resident’s student account. The signature on the housing contract indicates agreement to pay any fines or charges assessed.

Cancellation by Student prior to first date of contract period for students returning to the University.
Students must submit their contract cancellation request in writing to the Office of Residence Life.

Full Two Academic Year Contracts (Fall Semester start date): If a student requests cancellation  after the signing of a one year contract and prior to the first date of the contract period, the student shall incur a $500 cancellation fee and the forfeiture of the housing deposit.    

Spring Semester Only Contracts (Spring Semester start date): If the student requests cancellation after the signing of a one year contract and prior to the first date of the contract period, the student shall incur a $500 cancellation fee and the forfeiture of the housing deposit.

Exceptions:
The student may be granted a release of contract without forfeiture of the housing deposit or additional fees for reasons of non-enrollment (Non-enrollment refers only to students who have never enrolled in Truman or are withdrawn for academic suspension by the University), student teaching, internship, graduation, study abroad, or marriage. New students requesting a release from contract for any of these reasons must submit a written request by August 1 for the Fall Semester and November 15 for the Spring Semester to the Office of Residence Life. Students who are suspended or dismissed from the University will not be eligible to receive a refund of their deposit. Students going on study abroad, internship for which academic credit is earned, or student teaching must submit a letter from the office or department that is sponsoring the program stating that the student is enrolled in the program. All exceptions not listed in this section or otherwise clarified in the cancellation policy are at the discretion of the Director of Residence Life or an agent thereof.

Cancellation by the Student during the contract period:
If the student voluntarily requests cancellations of the Housing Contract during the period that the contract is in effect or is removed from housing for disciplinary reasons and remains enrolled in the university, the student shall forfeit the housing deposit, pay for 100% of room and board rates up to that period, and 40% of room rate for the remainder of the academic year. Voluntary release from contract will only be granted if there are extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control. The student must submit a written request to be released from the contract. Release from the contract can only be granted by the Director of Residence Life or an agent thereof.

Withdrawal from the University during the Contract period:
Should the student withdraw from the University during the contract period, the student will forfeit the housing deposit and be responsible for all housing and meal charges up to the week of check-out and 40% room rate for the remainder of the semester. Should the student withdraw during the final week of the semester or during the Winter break, the student will be charged a processing fee of $100 and forfeit the housing deposit. The student must check out from the residence halls within 24 hours of withdrawing from the University or incur fines for improper check-out and any other residence hall policy violations.

Reservation of Rights.
Housing Contracts are for the full academic year. Contracts are binding from the point of signature (electronic or written) in accordance with Missouri state law. All cancellations will be processed according to the University cancellation policies. The University reserves the right to terminate the residence hall or apartment contract of a student. The University reserves the right to make changes in the room and board fees and the University Residence Hall Calendar at any time. The University further reserves the right to make changes in the rules and regulations for University residence halls and colleges at any time. The University will attempt to give advance notice in the case of changes, but it shall not be required to do so.


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THE VALUE PLAN

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Terms and Conditions – Two Year Housing Contract

Contract Period: The two year housing contract spans over a two year period that can be made up of two complete academic years or a Spring semester and the subsequent academic year, excluding Summer sessions. A residence hall or apartment contract is binding for the period designated on the application-contract, which is signed on an individual basis by each student and becomes a contract upon acceptance by the University. Rooms may be occupied and meals will be served during the periods stated in the University Residence Hall calendar for the applicable semester or session. The room and board fees do not cover periods of time when the halls are closed for vacation, and residents may not live in the halls during such times.

Use of Assigned Room. The room assigned to a student is to be occupied by him or her, and a student may not sublet the assigned room. Rooms are for student residence purposes only, and a student may not use his or her assigned room for any commercial purposes whatsoever. Students may not allow another person to live with them who is not assigned to that room by the University. Students allowing an unassigned person to live with them will result in disciplinary action and possibly additional housing charges.

Student On-Campus Residency Requirement.
All first-time freshmen are required to live in campus housing. Exemptions include students over 21 years of age, married students or students commuting and living with a parent or legal guardian. Any student violating this policy is subject to housing charges applied to their account, and possible suspension from the University. Exemptions forms must be notarized and are legal documents.

Acceptance of Application. The University reserves the right to reject an application for accommodations in the University residence halls/apartments. If the University accepts an application, the student will pay all charges for the accommodations assigned at the rate and times established by the University.

Assignments. The University shall have the right and privilege to (a) change a student’s room (or roommate) assignment; (b) require a student to move to a different room; and (c) place additional students in a student’s assigned room. The inability of the University to grant a student’s assignment preference shall not void his or her application/contract. If a student fails to occupy his or her assigned room on or before the second day of classes
of the applicable period without notifying the Residence Life Office in writing of a delayed arrival, the tardy student’s room may be assigned to another student. However, a student’s delayed arrival shall not relieve the student from accepting other available accommodations, which may be assigned to him or her by the University. Students who sign a housing application/contract and fail to notify Residence Life that they will not be living on campus will subject to all contract breakage penalties, the loss of their housing deposit, and prorated room and board charges. The student may not alter or amend the application-contract.

Application of Deposit. A student shall pay the housing deposit at the time of his or her application for housing. The University will retain it until the end of the application/contract period. If the student has properly performed his or her duties under the contract, including proper checkout, and if the student does not have any delinquent debts to the University at the end of the contract period, a portion will be refunded to the student shortly thereafter. The remainder of the deposit will be retained as a processing fee in all cases. If a student is responsible for any unpaid damages or is delinquent on any debts to the University, the appropriate portion of the deposit will be applied toward the payment of such damages or debts, and the balance of the net deposit will be refunded. In the event a student is responsible for damages or delinquent debts in excess of the deposit, the entire amount will be applied toward the payment of such damages or debts, and the student shall be liable for the remaining balance of the damages or debts.

Refund of Deposit. The refundable portion of the deposit will be returned to a student upon satisfactory completion of his or her contract without any delinquent indebtedness to the University. The refundable portion of the deposit also will be returned to a student upon the following conditions:
(a) If the University does not accept the student’s application for housing or
(b) If the student is denied admission to the University for the applicable period.

The refundable portion of the deposit will be refunded to a student who has not previously attended the University if the student notifies the University in writing prior to May 1 for fall Semester and October 1 for Spring Semester enrollment that he or she will not be attending. In all other cases, the University reserves the right to retain the refundable portion of the deposit as liquidated damages for breach of contract.

Checkout and Vacation of Room. Upon termination of his or her contract, a student is required to complete a prescribed checkout procedure for his or her room in the presence of a staff member by following the procedures established by the Residence Life Office. Failure to check out properly will result in one or more of the following: retention of the refundable portion of the deposit as liquidated damages, an improper checkout fee, and/or a loss of key fee. In addition, the resident will be responsible for any additional damages. A student is required to vacate his or her assigned room by the times established by the Residence Life Office. Failure to vacate will result in additional charges.

Renewal of Contract. If a student requests the renewal of his or her contract for a subsequent period, and if the application for renewal is accepted by the University, then the refundable portion of the deposit for the current contract will be transferred to the student’s credit for the renewal contract. If the deposit is reduced to less than the refundable portion of the deposit (due to damages, other debts to the University, etc.) the student shall pay the necessary amount to restore the deposit to the full balance. In addition to the refundable portion of the deposit, the University may require partial prepayment of room and board fees for the new contract. If the student signs a new contract and then decides not to live in the residence halls or apartments for the new contract period, the University shall have the right to retain the refundable portion of the deposit, the required prepayment amount, and impose a penalty as damages for break of contract and possible prorated room and board charges.

Room and Board Fees. The fee structure from the first year of the contract remains constant for the life of the contract. The student does not need to stay in the same room, building, or room type for both years. The billing will reflect the fee structure from year one of the contract regardless of room type or building. The contract rate does not extend beyond year two of the contract. Subsequent housing contracts are independent.

Room and board fees are due on or before the dates stated in the residence hall/apartment payment schedule for the applicable period. If the designated amounts are not paid on or before the due dates, the University may assess an additional fee for each late payment. In addition, the University may 1) suspend board privileges during such periods of delinquency or 2) terminate the contract.

Inspection. The University reserves the right to enter the assigned room for the purpose of inspection, safety concerns, and maintenance or repair. The University further reserves the right to enter the assigned room and to inspect the possessions of the occupants if reasonable cause exists to believe that the student has violated University rules and regulations. The University reserves the right to remove or move personal belongings as part of this process.

Fire, Theft or Other Damage. The University shall not be responsible for the loss of, or damage to, any personal property of a student from any cause whatsoever. In the event the room assigned to a student is destroyed or rendered wholly uninhabitable by the University and the University does not elect to furnish other accommodations, the contract shall be terminated as of the date of destruction. In the event of such termination, any prepaid room and board fees shall be reduced proportionately. The University recommends that students take out homeowners or apartment insurance to protect their belongings.

Housekeeping Services. The University shall provide housekeeping service in the hallways and other common areas of the residence halls. Each student shall provide housekeeping services in his or her assigned room.

Damages. A student is liable for the cost of any repairs made necessary by the fault or negligence of the student or by his or her invited guests. The responsible resident shall pay the amount of damages to University property.

Rules and Regulations. A student shall comply with all rules and regulations for University residence halls and apartments, including but not limited to the rules and regulations contained in the University Residence Life Handbook. Violators of such rules and regulations are subject to disciplinary action and/or termination of contract by the University. Reasons for disciplinary action or termination include, but are not limited to: failure of the student to comply with the terms of this contract or be formally enrolled at the university; involvement of the student in actions or activities detrimental to the health, safety, welfare, or security of self or other residents, or disruptive of the residence
hall community. A housing contract may be immediately suspended and the resident required to vacate the premises when circumstances indicate that the resident’s continued presence in the living unit may constitute danger, or threat of danger, to property, the resident, or others in the housing system.

Other Debts to the University. If a student permits any debts to the University to become delinquent, the delinquency may result in the placement of a “hold order” on the student’s records. In addition, the University also may suspend the student’s board privileges or terminate the student’s housing contract.

Imposition of Fines and Charges. Fines may be assessed to a student(s) for violation of University or Residence Life Policies and/or the Student Conduct Code. Charges for damage to residence halls, rooms, and any other university property will be assessed to the resident’s student account. The signature on the housing contract indicates agreement to pay any fines or charges assessed.

Cancellation by Student prior to first date of contract period for students returning to the University. Students must submit their contract cancellation request in writing to the Office of Residence Life.

Full Two Academic Year Contracts (Fall Semester start date): If the student requests a cancellation after the signing of a two year contract and prior to the first date of the contract period, the student shall incur a $500 cancellation fee and the forfeiture of the housing deposit.    


Spring Semester Start Two Year Contracts (Spring Semester start date): If the student requests cancellation after the signing of a two year contract and prior to the first date of the contract period, the student shall incur a $500 cancellation fee and the forfeiture of the housing deposit.

Exceptions: The student may be granted a release of contract without forfeiture of the housing deposit or additional fees for reasons of non-enrollment (Non-enrollment refers only to students who have never enrolled in Truman), student teaching, internship, graduation, study abroad, or marriage. New students requesting a release from contract for any of these reasons must submit a written request by May 1 for the Fall Semester and November 15 for the Spring Semester to the Office of Residence Life. Students who are suspended or dismissed from the University will not be eligible to receive a refund of their deposit. Students going on study abroad, internship for which academic credit is earned, or student teaching must submit a letter from the office or department that is sponsoring the program stating that the student is enrolled in the program.

All exceptions not listed in this section or otherwise clarified in the cancellation policy are at the discretion of the Director of Residence Life or an agent thereof.

Cancellation by the Student during the first academic
year of the contract period:
If the student voluntarily requests cancellations of the Housing Contract during the first academic year that the contract is in effect or is removed from housing for disciplinary reasons and remains enrolled in the university, the student shall forfeit the housing deposit, pay for 100% of room
and board rates up to that period, 40% of room rate for the remainder of the first contract period year, and pay a $1000 termination fee. Voluntary release from contract will only be granted if there are extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control. The student must submit a written request to be released from the contract. Release from the contract can only be granted by the Director of Residence Life or an agent thereof.

Cancellation by the Student during the second year
of the contract period:
If the student voluntarily requests cancellation of the Housing Contract during the second academic year or summer sessions between academic years that the contract is in effect or is removed from housing for disciplinary reasons and remains enrolled in the university, the student shall forfeit the housing deposit, pay for 100% of room and board rates up to that period, and 40% of room rate for the remainder of the contract period. Voluntary release from contract will only be granted if there are extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control.
The student must submit a written request to be released from the contract. Release from the contract can only be granted by the Director of Residence Life or an agent thereof.

Withdrawal from the University during the Contract period: Should the student withdraw from the University during the contract period, the student will forfeit the housing deposit and be responsible for all housing and meal charges up to the week of check-out and 40% room rate for the remainder of the semester. Should the student withdraw during the final week of the semester or during the Winter break or Summer Break periods between academic year 1 and 2, the student will be charged a processing fee of $100 and forfeit the housing deposit. The student must check out from the residence halls within 24 hours of withdrawing from the University or incur fines for improper check-out and any other residence hall policy violations.

Reservation of Rights. Housing Contracts are for the full contract term. Contracts are binding from the point of signature (electronic or written) in accordance with Missouri state law. All cancellations will be processed according to the University cancellation policies. The University reserves the right to terminate the residence hall or apartment contract of a student. The University reserves the right to make changes in the room and board fees and the University Residence Hall Calendar at any time. The University further reserves the right to make changes in the rules and regulations for University residence halls and colleges at any time. The University will attempt to give advance notice in the case of changes, but it shall not be required to do so.


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Housing Appeals or Grievances

Residence Life offers a safe, living-learning environment where students can
learn about personal and social responsibility, embrace diversity, develop cultural
and aesthetic appreciation, and experience educational and leadership opportunities.
To achieve this goal, standards have been designed to promote and maintain an atmosphere conducive to community living. These community standards ensure the health, safety, and co-educational welfare of each resident and the protection of state property.

Occasionally, students are charged a fee or penalty to their student account for not upholding the housing contract. These types of fees or penalties can be from contract breakage before the academic year is over, damage fees, improper room moves or check-outs, etc. When a student disagrees with a housing-based fee or penalty that is charged, students are able to submit a written appeal to Residence Life. (For appeals regarding conduct sanctions, please see the Conduct Section of the handbook.) The process for submitting an appeal regarding a housing fee or penalty is as follows:

  1. Students must submit their appeals with a fully written explanation of their reason for appeal or for their grievance, with supporting documentation to the Residence Life Office (Missouri Hall 1100) within three weeks of the applied charge or grievance occurring. This appeal will be reviewed by the Residence Life Housing Appeals Board (during the academic year) or the Coordinators for Residence Life (during the summer months). Students may be asked to submit additional documentation, if deemed necessary to review the appeal. Students will generally be notified of the appeals decision within three weeks of submitting their appeal to Residence Life.
  2. This appeal must state the reasons why the student should be exempted from fees charged for their intended purposes or from being held responsible for the policy. The appeal letter must meet two conditions:
  1. It must cite the basis of the appeal;
  2. It must provide sufficient and detailed information to support the appeal. (Failure to meet either or both of these conditions will be sufficient cause to deny an appeal.)
  • The student can only appeal the decision of the Coordinators for Residence Life in the following circumstances:
    1. There is new information, unavailable at the time of the hearing, that is now available, and could materially impact the decision rendered by the Coordinators for Residence Life or his/her designee.
    2. “The finding of ‘responsible’ is not supported by substantial evidence.” In other words, an appeal can argue that the evidence was not substantial enough to justify a “responsible” finding by the Coordinators for Residence Life or his/her designee.
    3. “The sanction(s) imposed is not proportionate to the severity of the violations(s).” In other words, the appeal can argue that the sanctions were inappropriate when the circumstances of the act and prior record of the student are considered.

Appeals of the Coordinators for Residence Life or Appeals Board decision
will be heard by the Director of Residence Life. This appeal would be decided
within fourteen calendar days after the date of the appeal letter is delivered
to respond, unless there are extenuating circumstances that require additional
time for the review to be considered. The Director of Residence Life’s decision
will be final on behalf of the University. The decision letter will be sent
via mailed to the student’s local or permanent address or may be hand delivered
to the student.

On the rare occasion when the Director of Residence Life is unavailable to
conduct a review of a particular case, a designee may be appointed by the Dean
of Student Affairs. A Residence Life Housing Appeals Board is available during
the academic year to review any appeals by students who dispute a Contract Breakage Penalty or housing charges/damages.

Appeals can be submitted in writing to:
Office of Residence Life
100 E. Normal Ave.
Kirksville, MO 63501

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ResLife General Policies

Expected Conduct

Students are expected to comply with policies set out by Residence Life and the
University. Conduct actions and/or monetary fines may be assessed on a daily basis when students do not comply. Actions that may result in a fine are marked with a “” after the explanation.

Air Conditioners:

If you have health problems that necessitate the use of an air conditioner, you
must submit a physician’s certification of medical necessity to Residence Life before a work order can be submitted to have an air conditioner installed in your room. Physician notes are due to the Disability Services Office by August 1 (new note required each year), or a late penalty will be applied. A $100 energy use fee will be charged to your student account. Air conditioners must be no larger than 6,000 BTUs. All residents with air conditioners are required to provide their own air conditioner unit and submit a work order for installation to Facilities (660-785-4687). A survey of rooms containing air conditioners will be done after students move in, and any students who have unapproved air conditioners will be charged the energy use fee, fined, and required to remove them immediately.

Alcohol and Alcohol Paraphernalia:

Truman State University is a dry campus, which prohibits public intoxication
and the possession, use, and distribution of alcoholic beverages at any time on
University premises, regardless of age. Alcoholic paraphernalia (empty bottles/cans/containers, cases, beer bongs, etc.) is not permitted on campus. The consumption of, or being in the presence of, alcoholic beverages on campus is prohibited by University policy as established by the Board of Governors. Residence halls and all campus apartment complexes are located on University premises; therefore, any alcoholic beverage or container, located in any residence hall room or apartment is considered to be in violation with the University Student Code of Conduct. Violators of the dry campus policy are subject to strict University discipline. Students that violate Residence Life, campus, state, and federal laws/policies, or those that condone such violations through their presence when violations occur, are subject to sanctions through the residential and/or University conduct process. Students with prohibited alcohol related items will be asked to throw them away or take them home. If items are not removed, they may be confiscated.

Appliances or Electronic Devices:

Approved appliances and electronic devices for the residence halls and apartments are listed in this handbook. Students found in possession of unapproved appliances, or electronic devices, will be fined on a per item basis. The University reserves the right to restrict the use of your own appliances or furniture, i.e., musical instruments, extra refrigerators, and similar items. A list of approved and banned appliances is listed under the “Leave it at Home—What Not to Bring” section in this handbook. Items not on this list are subject to fine.

Barbecuing:

Students in residence halls may not possess personal grills or grill in areas
that are not designated within the residential communities. Public use grills are
available on campus in designated areas. Students living in the apartments may grill or barbecue with a charcoal or propane outdoor grill outside their apartments, and must tend their grills closely. Caution is urged in the handling and disposal of coals. Do not throw away warm or hot coals in the dumpsters or in any trash receptacle. Wait until coals are thoroughly cooled before disposing of them. Grills must be stored in the student’s apartment once they are cooled. If students dispose of warm or hot coals improperly, they may be charged a safety fine.

Bathrooms:

Residence hall bathrooms are available for guest use in a common area of the
building, generally near the main lounge. In buildings with community bathrooms, larger washroom facilities are available within each living space for each gender. Students may not enter the bathroom facility for the opposite gender and may be asked to leave the building or face a conduct hearing if doing so. Students will also be asked to use another bathroom while housekeeping is cleaning the bathrooms. Due to security for the residents, communal bathroom facilities are also locked, and students must use their assigned key to enter. Students may not prop the door open or prevent the locking mechanism to engage.

Bicycles:

Bicycles may be stored in your room. To conserve space we suggest:

  • Bicycles can be broken down into three parts: front wheel, back wheel, and frame.
  • Bicycles can be stored in a box, canvas bag, or something similar in order to provide maintenance free storage.
  • You are required to register your bicycle with the Department of Public
    Safety regardless of where it is stored. If the bicycle is lost or stolen, notify the Department of Public Safety.
  • The Department of Public Safety will remove all bicycles from the outside racks after students leave for the summer. If your bicycle is registered, DPS will attempt to notify you to claim it. If your bicycle is not registered, left unclaimed or uncollected, it will be deemed forfeited and stored for one year from collection, at which time it will be surplused and sold at a public auction.

Campaigning:

Public officials may not campaign for public office or distribute materials to
residents within the residence halls or apartments. Student candidates vying for
a student office on campus may only campaign within the residential areas according to University approved campaign policies, as developed jointly by Student Senate and Residence Life. People who do not campaign in accordance with these policies will be required to leave the building, and possibly face disciplinary actions. These students will also be reported to the Student Senate Ethics Committee. (See also Solicitation.)

Campus Mail:

Campus mail is provided for University offices to correspond directly with one
another. To be in compliance with U.S. Postal regulations, mail sent through campus mail must be related to University business, or proper postage must be used. Students may not use campus mail for personal mail to other students on campus. However, students or offices may use campus mail for University business or advertising for University related events only, and must clearly list the name of the campus department or organization, and their campus mailbox information in order for the item to be placed in mailboxes. Placing mail from off-campus businesses or private citizens is prohibited without proper postage.

Candles/Open Flames/Incense:

Candles and incense are not to be burned in the halls or apartments. They present a fire hazard and also produce odors, which disturb other residents. Any open flames are considered the largest fire hazard on college campuses, and are prohibited within any residential building.

Checkout Procedures:

If you are checking out of your room to make a hall/room change or are leaving
campus, you must meet with your Hall Director, Graduate Community Director, or Student Advisor. This meeting will allow us to obtain your forwarding address, assess any damage charges to your room, collect your key(s), etc. Students are required to checkout of their assigned living area within 24 hours of withdrawal from the University, or within 24 hours of their last final exam. If you do not properly check out of your room, you will be assessed an improper checkout fee of $50, a key re-core charge of $25, any room damage charges, loss of housing deposit, and possible daily housing fees. Residence halls/Apartments will follow proscribed checkout process for their
building, which will be announced before finals week. Students are required to follow the appropriate process within their living area, and must be fully ready to check out. If any item within your room (including windows and screens, closets, furniture, doors, and bathroom) is broken, you must call the Facilities Fix-It Line a minimum of one week before checkout. To be sure you have checked out properly, refer to the fliers that will be distributed about a week before finals each semester. If you are leaving before the semester ends, work with your Hall Director, Graduate Community Director, Student Advisor, or Apartment Manager to ensure you have checked out properly. Items not stored by a student after he or she has checked out of the building may be disposed of, donated to a local shelter, or recycled. (See also Storage under At Your Service.)

Citizenship:

In an effort to focus on community development and individual growth, we encourage all students to practice good citizenship. This involves courteously approaching neighbors to request that they lower the volume of their activities, refrain from activities that are disruptive to the community in which they live, or discontinue actions that are policy infractions. Not only is this practicing good citizenship, it is also more reflective of life off-campus. If individual attempts are unsuccessful, the duty SA may be contacted for further assistance. Students are asked to alert hall staff of any reoccurring noise or other problems so that they might assist in improving our living communities.

Combustibles or Dangerous Items:

Firearms, ammunition, fireworks, flammable paint, gasoline, and any other combustible items are not permitted in any residence hall or University Apartment. Locked storage for firearms, ammunition, and weapons is available through the Department of Public Safety. Flammable items are also considered as combustibles and may not be attached to any area that produces heat; this includes items suspended from or fastened flat against open light bulbs or heat sources in the rooms/apartments.

Damage/Vandalism:

Students are responsible for the condition of their rooms. The Housing Condition Report should be thoroughly and completely filled out in a detailed fashion when you move into your new room/apartment. This form will be used to determine what damages have occurred during the year. If damage other than normal wear and tear occurs, you will be charged accordingly. Damages will be deducted from your housing deposit, and any damage fees in excess of that deposit amount will be charged to you student account. The condition of public areas is the responsibility of all students. Please help maintain those areas by treating them with care. Damages occurring in public areas may be charged to those persons doing the damage. You can help keep your costs down by encouraging others to respect public areas and assume responsibility for your actions. If students who have done the damage are not identified and damages continue, the inevitable result may be charges applied to the entire community, group discipline, or an increase in room and board charges.

Decorating:

Adhesives, such as glue, duct tape, or anything that may remove paint may not
be used on the walls. Damage to walls, furniture, ceilings, doors, windows, or other items that is made to the room will be charged to the resident(s) at checkout. This also includes grout that is damaged on tile surfaces due to the use of Dry Erase makers. Students may not paint or wallpaper your rooms. Due to fire and safety concerns students may not hang signs or decorations on the hallway wall around their door. Decorations should not block lights or windows and must be fire retardant if hung near any heat source. In addition, beanbags made with polyethylene materials may not be used in the residence halls.

Door Propping:

The safety of residents in the building is critical. Allowing unauthorized visitors
into the building by not properly signing them in or by propping doors, imposes
a security risk for the people who live in that building. This includes propping
outside entrance doors to a building, room doors, bathroom doors, or any other doors within a building, as well as tampering with the locking mechanism. Students who deadbolt their door while the door is open so that it will NOT close cause damage to the door frame, causing the locking mechanism to not function properly. This action may also be found in violation of this policy. Any student caught propping a door, allowing students to enter the building without signing in after hours (12 am – 6 am), or entering the building through a propped door or red Perimeter Access door may be subject to disciplinary action and denied entrance. This is considered unauthorized access and falls within the door propping policy. Door propping also includes taping or otherwise interfering with the locking mechanism of any door, so that it does not lock. The use of a doorstop that does not damage the door, frame, hinge, or other hardware is permitted.

Drugs & Drug Paraphernalia:

Federal and state laws forbid the sale and use of drugs that are not prescribed
by a physician or not available on the legal open market. The University prohibits possession, use or distribution of marijuana, LSD, or other hallucinogens or narcotics or any other illegal drug by any of its students in any campus facility, or at any University/Residence Life sponsored event. Any student possessing, using, or distributing drugs is subject to University disciplinary action, removal from on-campus housing, arrest, imprisonment, or fine according to state law. Drug paraphernalia is not permitted in the residence halls.

Electrical Systems:

To ensure the safety for all residents, tampering with electrical systems (dimmer switches, circuit breaker boxes, cables, wiring, etc.) is not allowed.

Escort Policy:

Students who live in a residential community on campus may gain access to any
residence hall by using their student ID from 10:30 a.m. – midnight to open a green or yellow perimeter access door. A guest to a residence hall, who is not a current student living on campus, must be registered after 12:00 a.m. with the Night Monitor each evening, and must be escorted by a resident within the building after the building is locked for the evening. All guests to a building must show their ID after midnight. Guests must show appropriate picture identification during registration. Guests
and residents registering under false names will be considered a security risk,
and will be denied entrance to the building. In addition, guests must follow the
same University and residence hall policies, or he/she and the resident will be
held responsible. (See also Overnight Guests.)

Evacuation (Bomb Threats & Fire Alarms):

Everybody is required to evacuate any building where an alarm is sounding or
when instructed by residence hall staff. Failure to evacuate a building will result
in disciplinary action and fines. (See also Fire.)

Eviction or Banning:

Students who are evicted from campus residential facilities for disciplinary
reasons, due to the student’s violation of Residence Life policies and the Student Conduct Code, may be assessed a damage fee and will lose their housing deposit. Students are required to leave their Residence Life area by the date/time established by the Residence Life Office, or within 24 hours of their last final. Failure to vacate within the set times will result in fines or penalties. Students who have been banned from entering residence halls/apartments will be reported to Public Safety, and handled according to Missouri State laws for trespassing if found in violation of the banning/restriction.

Fire or Bomb Threat:

False fire alarms are illegal and dangerous. Every time a building is evacuated
there is the possibility of injury. Everyone must evacuate any time the alarm sounds. Any student found guilty of causing a false fire alarm or calling in a false bomb threat, will be subject to arrest and disciplinary action by the University and local police, including possible removal from on-campus housing. Any student found guilty of starting a fire will be charged for the cost of repair or replacement of all damaged areas of University property in addition to disciplinary fines.

Firearms/Weapons:

Possession of firearms, hunting knives, bows and arrows, air-soft guns etc.,
or any item deemed usable as a potential weapon, is strictly prohibited in any on-campus environment. Any student found in possession of weapons will be subject to disciplinary action by the University, including potential removal from on-campus housing. Students who wish to bring firearms, weapons, or other equipment for recreational or hunting use to campus may store these items in a safe, located in the Department of Public Safety’s Office. Arrangements for storage must be made prior to bringing the item(s) to campus. (See also Combustibles.)

Fire Equipment:

Individuals who steal or improperly use fire equipment will be charged for repair or replacement of the equipment, and will be subject to disciplinary action. Tampering with, or misuse of a fire alarm system, extinguishers, or detection equipment, and non-compliance/ interference with evacuation procedures, is strictly prohibited.

Each University apartment is equipped with a chemical fire extinguisher. Students should check their extinguisher to ensure it is properly charged, and may contact their Apartment Manager or Facilities if it needs to be recharged. Each apartment is also provided with an adequate number of smoke detectors, and should contact Facilities or their Apartment Manager if the battery runs low.

Furniture:

Furniture placed in lounges and other public areas is for the use of all residents.
All room furniture must stay in your room. Please do not remove furniture from the lounge. Any student with lounge furniture that has been moved into his/her room or to an inappropriate area may be fined. While an attempt is made to standardize furniture among residence hall rooms, and from apartment to apartment, occasionally different types of furniture may be used in different rooms or apartments. You may bring your own furniture; however, you must keep the University owned furniture in your room or apartment. Waterbeds are not allowed. The University reserves the right to restrict the use of your own furniture or appliances. A list of approved and banned appliances is listed under the “Leave it at Home— What Not to Bring” section in this handbook. Items in question should be addressed with the Residence Life Office.

Gambling:

In accordance with the laws of the state of Missouri, gambling is not permitted within the residence halls or apartments.

Hallway Sports/Behaviors:

Residence hall corridors are designed as passageways and not for recreational activities. Frisbee, golf, kickball, and other games played in all common areas, including hallways, lounges, kitchens, laundry rooms, computer rooms, etc., within the building may be harmful to residents, or to the condition of the building. Jogging, skateboarding, and rollerblading are not permitted in the building. Students holding discussion groups and using radios, dvd/ mp3 players, etc., must do so in their rooms or in common lounge areas with respect to other residents using that space.

Hallway Decorations and Storage:

Corridors may not be used to store excess items from your room. Items, including welcome mats, found in the hallways will be removed. Any items posted on the wall surrounding your door in the hallway are also not permitted and may be removed if housekeeping needs to clean these areas.

Holiday Decorations:

To avoid a fire hazard, live, cut trees are not permitted in your room. Students may have small potted plants in their rooms. Low heat bulbs and flame retardant materials may be used to decorate. Outdoor or high heat decorations are not allowed.

Lounge Spaces:

Common lounge spaces are designed for the use of all residents within any given area of the building. Students should refrain from leaving materials behind in the lounge areas unless they plan to return to them within a short period of time. Students who leave materials in the lounges prevent others from using that space, and demonstrate a disregard for the community. Please refrain from sleeping in public areas within the residence halls.

Microwaves:

Residents of BNB Hall, Centennial Hall, Dobson Hall, Missouri Hall, Ryle Hall, West Campus Suites, Randolph & Campbell Apartments may bring their own microwave (1000 watts or smaller). Microwaves for community use are provided in floor kitchenettes.

Noise Policy:

Quiet Hours

  • Sunday – Thursday: 10:30 p.m. – 7 a.m.
  • Friday & Saturday: 12 midnight – 9 a.m.

During these hours, noise must be kept to a minimum to allow residents to study, relax, and sleep. Noise should not be heard in another room, out the window, or within two doors away in the hallway. The quiet hour policy applies to the building itself and the surrounding grounds outside of the building. Sound producing equipment may be played anytime, however it must comply with all established guidelines. Group activities during quiet hours are permitted only in student rooms or in special lounge areas. If you are in the hallway a normal speaking voice is acceptable. Note: Facilities will attempt to observe quiet hours; however, they will begin working around 5 AM and are not required to abide by posted quiet hours in completing their work.

Courtesy Hours

  • Sunday – Thursday, 7 a.m. – 10:30 p.m.
  • Friday – Saturday, 9 a.m. – 12 midnight

During courtesy hours, reasonable noise levels are to be maintained. Loud volumes, whether through music or disturbances that affect hallways or buildings are not acceptable. Any request to lower one’s volume should be complied respectfully as part of standards for the community.

Final Exam Quiet Hours

During final exams, quiet hours are extended to 22 hours per day.

Final Exam Courtesy Hours

  • 6 – 8 p.m.

More Restrictive Hours

Each Residence Hall Senate may extend quiet hours beyond the minimum established limits. Changes to standard quiet hour times should be clearly posted within each Residence Hall.

Perimeter of Residence Halls

Campus organizations, residence halls, and community groups may not schedule events physically located outside of halls without permission from the Hall Director. Such activities can cause unacceptable noise levels for residents and safety problems.

Musical Instruments

Refer to Musical Instruments

Non-compliance:

Students are required to comply with the directives given to them by any University official or on procedures documents, or they will face sanctions or fines. Non-compliance with a University official can and will be subject to further disciplinary action. This involves failure to appear at a conduct or disciplinary hearing.

Overnight Guests:

Residence hall rooms and apartments are living spaces for the students assigned to that area only. The 24-hour visitation policy is set up to allow students the ability to bring friends into their living environment at any time. An overnight guest is a non-resident of a particular living space who is visiting a student living in the residence hall or apartment. Guests (anybody not assigned to your room) may not live or stay in your room. Only people who are assigned to live in a room or apartment are allowed to live there. Students who have a child(ren) may not allow their child(ren) to stay or live with them in their residence hall room during the academic year. (Summer camp participants need express permission from the Office of Residence Life.) Apartment residents must inform Residence Life of any children that are living with them if they are assigned to a designated family housing unit.

Married housing rates will apply to parents living in the apartments who have children living with them on a full-time basis. Any guest in a residence hall after 12:00 a.m. must be registered with the Night Monitor each evening and must be escorted by a resident after the building is locked. Overnight guests are only allowed with the permission and approval of the roommate(s). Approved guests will be allowed to stay a maximum of three nights. There is no charge for approved overnight weekend guests. Room keys and perimeter access cards will not be issued to any guest. All guests are expected to follow all University policies, and must not disrupt any community members. Your roommate must approve the guest in the room, or your guest may be asked to leave the room or visit with you in a common lounge. Residents are responsible for the actions of their guests and are liable for any damages to University property caused by their guests. Students assigned to the apartments may not allow other students to live there during University breaks where the residence halls are closed. A prorated fee may be charged to a student’s accounts if he/she allows an unapproved guest(s) to live in his/her assigned apartment during University breaks.

Painting Room:

Students are not allowed to paint their rooms. The Facilities Office schedules regular painting for all areas on campus. If you have a painting need, you may call the Facilities Office with your request.

Parking:

Parking is permitted only for properly registered vehicles displaying a decal, which may be purchased at the Business Office. Student must first apply for registration through Public Safety. State laws are followed for ticketing or towing in fire zones, handicapped spaces, and other specially marked spaces.

Poster/Publicity Display:

If you want to post publicity items, notices, etc. that are in relation to a University sponsored organization or event, you must have the postings submitted to the Residence Life Office (Missouri 1100). The University’s and Residence Life’s posting policies are available through the Center for Student Involvement. When posting, the following guidelines should also be observed:

  • No posters, signs, banners, etc., are to be placed on the outside of the halls, including columns outside entrances and doorways, lawn areas, trees, etc.
  • Posters may not promote the use of alcohol or drugs, or engagement in illegal activities.
  • All posters must clearly indicate the name of the student organization or office that is sponsoring the event/activity/etc.
  • Excessive posters may not be posted, and posters may be hung on bulletin boards throughout individual houses within the residence halls at the discretion of the Student Advisor or
  • Apartment Manager and the Hall Director who oversees that area. Hall staff will hang all posters.
  • No material may be posted on the walls outside the door to students’ rooms. Posting on student room doors is only allowed with the permission of the students living in that room.
  • Organizations and individuals violating guidelines will have all publicity removed and may face suspension of posting privileges.
  • Non-residence hall organizations and individuals must request to have publicity posted through a staff member.
  • Possession of road signs is a violation of state law and will be reported to the Department of Public Safety.

Room Doors:

Exterior and interior finishes on room doors are easily damaged by tape, tacks,
etc. If you choose to post materials on the inside or outside of your door or doorframe, you assume full responsibility for damage (including damage created to the door if those posted materials are vandalized). Tape, nails, glue, etc. that can damage a door should not be used to post materials. You are responsible for removing all tape and mounting materials from your door prior to check out. You may not post materials on the walls around your door in the hallway. Any material posted on the outside of doors that is deemed to be offensive by residence hall staff may be required to be removed. You are also not allowed to tamper with the locking mechanism on the door in any way. If the door lock is taped or tampered with in any way, this is considered door propping. (See Door Propping.)

Screen Opening/Removal:

Window screens are not to be removed, or opened, without the permission of the Hall Director. Screens are not intended for frequent opening and closing. The opening, or removal of screens, results in damage to the screens and fixtures. If screens are opened or removed without permission, a fine will be levied and/or damages will be assessed, in addition to possible disciplinary action. Students are also not allowed to throw items from windows, since this is considered a safety hazard.

Smoking:

All campus living environments (residence halls and apartments) are smoke free areas. Therefore, smoking within any area (rooms, community spaces, hallways, etc.) in the residence halls or apartments is strictly prohibited. Electronic cigarettes or similar devices are also not allowed to be used in the residence halls. Storage of hookahs is not permitted in the residence halls or student rooms on campus. As of July 1, 2015, Truman State University is a smoke free campus. Students, staff, faculty, and guests are prohibited from smoking on campus property.

Solicitation:

The University does not allow door-to-door solicitation of products or services in the halls. Printed material may not be distributed under students’ doors. Student rooms are not to be used for group commercial solicitation. This policy applies to all campus organizations as well as off-campus groups or individuals. Violation of this solicitation policy may result in revocation of the approval for that organization to hang posters within the residence halls. (See also Campaigning.)

Tack, Tape, and Adhesives:

Carpet tape, duct tape and other adhesives are not allowed due to the gummy residue they leave behind. Poster tack or products that do not damage the walls are allowed. Any adhesive or residue remaining on doors, floors, walls, ceilings, or in any part of the room or bathroom may result in damage charges.

Trespassing in Unauthorized Areas:

Several areas exist within the residence halls that students are not allowed to enter. These includes areas under construction or renovation, maintenance rooms, steam tunnels, roofs, or any other area that indicates students should not enter. These areas are deemed danger zones, and only accessible to authorized University personnel. Students entering these areas without an authorized University, full-time professional staff member will be cited for trespassing.

Unauthorized Moves:

Students who wish to move to another area on campus must work with their Hall Director or Graduate Community Director to complete the proper procedures. Students who do not complete the process properly may be cited with an improper move/ improper checkout fine.

University Identification Card:

Each student will be issued one University identification card at the beginning of the first year. This ID card should be kept with you at all times, as faculty and staff members reserve the right to request your ID to verify your identity. This card is for your use only and is nontransferable. A student caught with someone else’s ID card, and the owner of the card, will be referred to the University conduct system. If a card is lost, the student will be charged $25 for a replacement card.

Visitation Hours & Escort Policy:

The halls have a 24-hour visitation policy that is defined as, “the act of visiting a resident within the building” not “cohabitation.” Guests must also be approved by the roommate, and may be asked to go to a common lounge if the roommate does not wish for that person to be in their room. During designated hours anyone wishing to enter a hall must be escorted by resident of that community. Guests must be registered at the night monitor desk of each hall after 12:00 a.m. Phones for community use are located in the main lounges, and may be used to call the escort.

Web Cameras:

The use of a web camera is allowed with consent of the roommate(s). Students are expected to respect the privacy of others in their room, within their community, and not broadcast others without their consent. Students not respecting others’ rights within the community with the use of their web cameras, may be required to remove the camera from their room.


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Truman’s Alcohol Policy

The Lowdown About Being Dry

Truman State University is a dry campus, which prohibits public intoxication and the possession, use, and distribution of alcoholic beverages at any time on University premises, regardless of age. The consumption of, or being in the presence of, alcoholic beverages on campus is prohibited by University policy as established by the Board of Governors. Residence halls and all campus apartment complexes are located on University premises. Therefore, any alcoholic beverage or container, located in any residence hall room or apartment, is considered to be in violation with the University Student Code of Conduct. Informal surveys of residents have indicated that the vast majority of the alcohol from empty beverage containers was consumed within the students’ residence hall rooms. Therefore, the University also began prohibiting the possession or display of empty alcohol beverage containers within the residence halls.

Violators of the dry campus policy are subject to strict University discipline.
Students that violate Residence Life, campus, state, and federal laws/ policies,
or those that promote or support such violations through their presence when violations occur, are subject to sanctions through the residential and/or University conduct process. Alcoholic paraphernalia (empty bottles/cans, cases, etc.) is not permitted in the residence halls/apartments.

University and Residence Life Protocol

Those who violate the alcohol policies, and guests in incidents involving alcohol, are subject to a conduct review through Residence Life and/or the Conduct Officer. This is a campus-wide policy.

The unlawful manufacturing, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited on all property owned or operated by the University. The manufacturing, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of intoxicating liquor is also prohibited on the University campus, except for those times, places, and purposes approved by the President of the University. The presence of persons under the influence of unlawful drugs or intoxicating liquor is also prohibited on the University campus. Any student who violates this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of residential housing contract and eviction, and up to and including expulsion from the University.


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University Conduct Process

Citizenship and Community Standards

The Office of Citizenship and Community Standards (OCCS) is charged with the administration of the Student Conduct Code. This Conduct Code creates an expectation of behavior that the University views as acceptable and appropriate. The University recognizes the significance of students’ rights. Those rights include freedom of expression, autonomy, procedural protection, and the respect for personal integrity of all members of the community and their property. By ensuring those individual rights, the University fosters an environment conducive to students’ success and well-being. By doing so, students respect the dignity, rights, and property of the University community.

The Office of Citizenship and Community Standards (OCCS) strives to resolve allegations of misconduct under the Student Conduct Code in a manner consistent with its core values of fairness, honesty, and integrity. The Office acknowledges the importance of balancing the interests of the individual student or student organization and the community at large, as well as protecting the integrity of the institution and its values. To that end, the OCCS seeks to enhance the educational mission of the University by promoting a caring, just, and responsible community. To foster the development of future leaders and responsible citizens, OCCS promises to support the academic community by promoting and investing in students’ holistic learning, ethical growth, and character development.

Rooted in the educational philosophy of citizenship and character development, the administration of the Truman State University Student Conduct Code provides for the following:

  • the development, dissemination, interpretation, and enforcement of campus policy;
  • the protection of relevant rights of the University community and its participants;
  • a system that provides fair and impartial hearings that proceed with reasonable speed and efficiency without sacrificing fairness to the student or the University;
  • the facilitation and encouragement of responsibility and respect for campus governance; opportunities for ethical growth and personal accountability of students; and
  • the development of the individual when the student does not pose a threat to self, others, or the functioning of the university community, and when a repetition of misconduct is unlikely.

The Office of Citizenship and Community Standards is located in Student Union Building 1110, and may be contacted at (660) 785- 4111, occs@truman.edu, or on the web at www.truman.edu/conduct/. For a current copy of the Student Conduct Code, please see the Citizenship and Conduct website.

University Conduct Process

Students who violate University or Residence Life policies will be subject to a conduct review. The Hall Director, Residence Life Conduct Board, Coordinator of Student Life and Development, Coordinator of Facilities and Processes, Director of Residence Life, or the University Conduct Officer may conduct this hearing. To protect and ensure students due process, all hearings will follow the same general outline.

  • The student(s) will receive a notice of charges letter that will include the date(s), location(s) and description of the alleged incident/behavior, which policy may have been violated, the date, time and location of the hearing, and how to reschedule the appointment if necessary.
  • The participants at the hearing will introduce themselves and the purpose of the meeting will be described to the resident(s).
  • The charges and applicable policy will be read to the resident(s) and all available evidence will be read to the resident(s).
  • The student(s) will be asked to present a statement of defense and the names of any witnesses.
  • If witnesses are available at the meeting, they will be asked to provide their testimony.
  • If necessary, further investigation will occur.
  • A determination of responsibility will be made and appropriate sanctions will be decided.
  • A decision letter will be provided to the resident(s) including the violations the resident was found responsible for, a description of the sanction(s), sanction due dates, and the process and grounds for appeal.

Conduct Information

A Student Conduct Board hears cases of alleged misconduct when a student’s alleged behavior is detrimental to the Residence Life community. This board is comprised of students who live within the residence halls or apartments and work in conjunction with the Residence Life staff and the University Conduct Officer. If you would like to serve as a member of this board, contact your Hall Director.

Sanctions for violating Residence Life and/or University policies will range from warnings to expulsion from Residence Life and the University, and may include educational sanctions and fines. Failure to attend a hearing, comply with, or complete assigned disciplinary sanctions can and will result in further conduct review, including the holding of grades.

A process for appeals is available for students found responsible for violating a Residence Life policy by the Hall Director, or the Residence Life Conduct Board, may appeal the findings or sanctions to the Residence Life Conduct Officer (Coordinator for Residence Life). This appeal must be submitted in writing to the Coordinator within seven (7) days of the receipt of the decision letter. The only grounds an appeal may be made on are:

  • the hearing panel deprived the defendant of a right the defendant had according to the rules and regulations governing the university Conduct System; and this deprivation materially affected the decision;
  • the finding of “in violation” is not supported by substantial evidence;
  • the sanction(s) imposed is not representative of the violation based upon circumstances of the act of misconduct and the prior record of the defendant.

The letter of appeal must cite which ground(s) the appeal is made on and any evidence the student has in defense. The burden of proof lies with the student in the appeals process. The Coordinator for Residence Life who serves as the Residence Life conduct officer will notify the student of the decision within ten (10) working days. The appeal process for decisions made in the Office is Citizenship and Community Standards will follow the outlined procedure in the Student Conduct Code. The Office of Citizenship and Community Standards is located in the Student Union Building in Room 1110 within the Student Affairs Office.


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Safety First

The 411 about 911. If you need to report an emergency, need assistance from Public Safety, you may dial x911 from any campus phone. They will contact medical or fire safety personnel as needed. You may also use any blue or red safety phone located around campus in any emergency.

Earthquakes:

Did you feel the earth move? Although Truman’s campus has never experienced an earthquake, a fault line exists in eastern Missouri. Therefore, in the event that an earthquake occurs and you are inside, remember to either: 1) take cover under heavy furniture; 2) brace yourself in a doorway; or 3) move against an interior wall.

Evacuation:

Everyone Out! If you are required to evacuate the building for a fire or other reason remember to use the stairs, close all doors behind you, turn off all electronics, evacuate in groups, provide assistance to others, and evacuate in a safe and orderly manner.

If the building is being evacuated due to a bomb threat, follow the same steps as listed above, but DO NOT turn any electronic devices on or off.

Fire Alarms and Drills:

Sound the fire alarm if you discover a fire, no matter how insignificant it may appear. Then notify the hall staff immediately. The building should be evacuated before there is any attempt to contain the fire. Remember, most injuries occur from smoke and toxic fumes, not flames. Failure to cooperate in an alarm or drill, including the failure to evacuate the building, will result in a safety fine and a possible University Conduct hearing. Students who sleep soundly and may have difficulty hearing an alarm should work with other students in their community to notify them of alarms that may sound. False fire alarms are illegal and dangerous. Every time a building is evacuated there is the possibility of injury. Frequent alarms tend to create a feeling of false security and it becomes more difficult to evacuate the building.

In the event of a real fire, this could lead to serious consequences. Fire drills will be conducted regularly to ensure that students are able to exit the buildings safely during a time when there is not a known danger. Everyone must evacuate any time the alarm sounds. Any student found guilty of purposely causing a fire, a false fire alarm, or bomb threat will be subject to arrest, disciplinary action, and/or significant fines by the University. This disciplinary action may include expulsion from the Residence Life residences and the University.

Medical Emergencies:

Is There a Doctor in the House? If you or someone you know experiences an injury/illness that is severe or life threatening, dial x911. Do not move a person unless he/she is in danger. Call a Student Advisor, Hall Director, or the Community Coordinator for assistance. Hall Directors and Community Coordinators are certified in CPR and First Aid. All Student Advisors are trained in First Aid, while some are certified in CPR and First Aid.

Medical Transport of Residents: If it becomes necessary for a resident to go to the hospital, do not transport another resident yourself. Instead, you may:

  • Call an ambulance in an emergency by dialing x911.
  • Call a taxi, at the expense of the resident, if it is a non-emergency and no other alternate means of transportation is available.

Truman’s Residence Life staff will not provide transportation for students to or from any facilities for medical purposes.

Tornados:

Toto, We’re not in Kansas Anymore! The following guidelines are for use in the event that tornado warnings are issued. Tornado warnings are ordered when a funnel cloud has actually been seen. A tornado watch is ordered when weather conditions are such that a tornado could occur. You should seek shelter from the upper floors of the building, leave your room and other areas with windows, and take shelter in protected areas away from the exterior of the building. Doors to student rooms should be closed. Areas of shelter include interior hallways, basements, lower floors, and windowless rooms. In the event of a tornado warning, you should remain within the building. Staff members will alert each floor that a tornado warning is in effect, and when the warning has expired.

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A Few Reasons to Live on Campus

  • Get better grades. Students who live on campus have shown that they do better academically. They take more academic credits, have higher grade point averages, and graduate at a higher rate. Give yourself a competitive edge. Achieve more here at Truman, and you’ll have a better chance in the job market!
  • Less hassle with monthly bills. Live on campus and pay a competitive cost for housing and meals. You will not have to worry about extra utility bills, advanced rent, or security deposit. All of your bills for the semester are included in one lump sum that is charged to your student account. No expensive trips to the store, and no chasing down roommates for their part of the rent.
  • Make college life easier. Live on campus and enjoy the convenience of being close to classes, the Student Union, the library, computer labs, good places to eat, recreation facilities, and tons of campus events. No worries about starting your car and finding a parking space on cold mornings.
  • Be more involved. Live on campus and be “in the know.” There is always something to do on campus or in the residence halls. You can walk to attend an athletic event, take in a play or musical performance, go to a poetry reading, exercise at the Student Recreation Center and attend various campus events. Plus, there is always someone around who is up for some fun!
  • Make friends and feel connected. Live on campus and you’ll meet more people—guaranteed! Friendships formed during your college years often last a lifetime. You’ll feel a greater sense of connection with Truman and with the people you know here. Plus, the friends you make will be close by for you to study and hang out with.
  • Controlled, smoke-free environment. On campus, all of our living communities are smoke-free. If you have allergies or medical conditions (or just don’t like smoking), you will be able to find appropriate, smoke-free living communities on campus.
  • Broaden your horizons. Living on campus will make you a well-rounded person. Studies show on-campus residents meet more diverse people, are exposed to a wider range of ideas and cultures, develop greater artistic interests, develop strong interpersonal skills, and build high self-esteem.
  • Be comfortable and safe. Reap the advantages of lively surroundings, security patrols, fire and safety processes, and Hall staff assistance on demand. Live on campus and have a comfortable and safe new home away from home.
  • Accessible campus resources. Live on campus and enjoy hall lounges, computer labs, laundry rooms, dining establishments, and hall desk services. On campus students gain direct access to cable television, and the campus computer network with free top-speed Internet.
  • Build leadership skills. Live on campus and you can get involved in activities and organizations such as residence hall events, student government, intramural sports, and campus clubs. Showing leadership experience on your resume will mean a lot to your future employers and make you a more marketable candidate!
  • Pursue your interests. Live on campus and participate in programs that awaken new interests or nurture the ones you already have. Being involved in programs in music, art, language, and cultural activities enhances your education and your social life.
  • Academic & Personal Support. Live on campus and you have close, convenient access to professionally trained Academic Advisors, and personal support from the Hall Directors and their staff.

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Important Numbers

Emergency Calls – 911
Non-Emergency Calls – 9.665.5621

When using a campus phone to call another campus phone number, only dial the last four digits.

Residence HallMailing AddressHall DeskHall Office
Blanton-Nason-Brewer Hall1009 South Mulanix660-785-4709660-785-4710
Campbell Apartments1601 South Florence660-785-7294660-785-7637
Centennial Hall1000 South Franklin660-785-4829660-785-4830
Dobson Hall1111 South Mulanix660-785-4263660-785-4293
Missouri Hall809 South Mulanix660-785-5383660-785-4472
Randolph Apartments516 East Randolph660-785-4263660-785-4293
Ryle Hall1215 South Mulanix660-785-5706660-785-5707
West Campus Suites215 West Normal660-785-5500660-785-5503

 

OfficeLocationPhone
Residence Life OfficeMissouri Hall 1100660-785-4227
New Student Programs (formerly RCP)Kirk Building 112660-785-4409
Athletics – Department OfficePershing 213660-785-4235
Business Office (Student Accounts/Cashiers)McClain 105660-785-4149
Center for International Education and Study AbroadBaldwin Hall 106660-785-4076
Center for International Students (CIS)Baldwin Hall 104660-785-4215
Center for Student InvolvementStudent Union 2000660-785-4222
Dean of Student Affairs Office (DOSA)Student Union 1110660-785-4111
Department of Public Safety (DPS)General Services Building660-785-4176
Parking ServicesGeneral Services Building660-785-7400
Facilities Fix-It Line (I Need This Repaired)General Services Building660-785-INTR
Greek LifeStudent Union 1109660-785-7205
ID Office – Student Identification CardsMissouri Hall 1100660-785-4123
Information Technology Services (ITS)Pickler Memorial Library660-785-4544
Office of Citizenship and Community Standards (OCCS)Student Union 1110660-785-4111
Media Center
Index newspaper
Echo yearbook
KTRM Radio
Barnett Hall660-785-4449
660-785-4450
660-785-5876
Multicultural AffairsAdair House660-785-4142
Pickler Memorial LibraryPickler Memorial Library660-785-4038
Registrar’s OfficeMcClain 104660-785-4143
Disabilities ServicesMcKinney Center660-785-4478
Student Activities Board (SAB)Student Union 1110660–4722
Student Health CenterMcKinney Center660-785-4182
Student Recreation CenterStudent Recreation Center660-785-4847
Student SenateStudent Union 1110660-785-4193
Student UnionStudent Union 2000660-785-4186
Truman State University BookstoreStudent Union, lower level660-785-4212
University Career CenterSUB 3100Mc785-4353
University Counseling Services (UCS)McKinney Center660-785-4014
Provost for Academic Affairs (VPAA)McClain 203660-785-4105
Writing CenterKirk Building 120660-785-4484
Truman State University Information660-785-4000